IMERSA Summit 2016: Announcing Slack

slack-in-the-charles-hayden-planetarium-cropped

Recently I’ve been brainstorming how to better connect the IMERSA members. Part of what makes going to the summit so great is the random people you meet. And so we are experimenting with how we can better connect people of similar interests. We are hoping that smartphones can be part of the equation.

So we are using “Slack” to continue the amazing conversations that happen at the IMERSA Summit. It’s both an icebreaker into the community and way for you to keep your ear to the ground. And also, it’s free.

To join the IMERSA Slack group, please request an invitation.


Slack-logo-transparent
After you’ve registered, then be sure to install the Slack app on your smartphone (iPhone or Android). But you can also use Slack on any web browser. Then join some channels relevant to your interests and start by sharing a recent project you’ve worked on.

IMERSA.slack.com

Upcoming Special Events in the Planetarium

EinsteinsPlayground-ASlowerSpeedofLight
Image Source: A Slower Speed of Light

Einstein’s Playground

— Thursday, February 11 /// 7:15pm
— Admission $10
— Gerd Kortemeyer, PhD, associate professor of physics at Michigan State University

Have you ever wanted to experience the complete distortion of time and space as we know it? The Charles Hayden Planetarium has partnered with the MIT Game Lab to immerse you in a virtual special relativity playground where you’ll witness the laws of physics in a completely new way. Using the power of video games, we’ll turn Einstein’s most famous theory from an abstract concept into something you can encounter yourself right here at the Museum of Science. Experience the effects of movement, time, and space as you’ve never been able to before!

Tickets on sale beginning January 28 /// (January 26 for Museum members)


AWorldUnderwater-TheReefsofBelize-KeithEllenbogen_5309952
Image Source: Keith Ellenbogen

A World Underwater: The Reefs of Belize

— Thursday, March 24 / 7:00pm
— Admission Free
— Keith Ellenbogen, award-winning underwater photographer and 2015-16 CAST Visiting Artist at MIT | Allan Adams, PhD, theoretical physicist, associate professor of physics and member of the Creative Art Council at MIT

Take an underwater journey to Glover’s Reef Research Station in Belize and immerse yourself in coral reefs! With images and cutting-edge immersive video captured during their January 2016 expedition, Keith and Allan will tell the story of the Mesoamerican reef ecosystem, the researchers working hard to conserve it, and the innovative MIT course behind the expedition in which students from across the institute (chemists, civil engineers, historians, physicists, and poets) learned the art, technique, and technology of underwater conservation photography. Under the Planetarium’s fulldome expanse, experience the thrills, challenges, and serendipity of wildlife photography and explore the role of visual culture as a catalyst for positive social change on our tiny blue planet.

Advance registration beginning March 10 /// (March 8 for Museum members)


StoriesUnderTheStars-Ari-Daniel-Hubble-2013-17-a-large_web-cropped
Image Source: NASA, ESA, CXC and the University of Potsdam, JPL-Caltech, and STScI

Stories Under the Stars

— Wednesday, April 20 / 7:30pm
— Admission $12
— Ari Daniel, science reporter

Come to the Charles Hayden Planetarium for an evening of live storytelling, radio, and music under the stars. You’ll hear true stories, both personal and inspired by science, that explore the theme of “Light in the Dark,” all unfolding beneath the canopy of our cosmos. Join the search for light during the earliest moments of your life and from the outer reaches of our universe to the inner reaches of the human heart.

Tickets on sale beginning January 28 /// (January 26 for Museum members)
Hosted by science reporter Ari Daniel and co-produced by Ari and the Museum of Science as part of the Cambridge Science Festival.


SpaceStation-ISSCupola-cropped
Image Source: NASA

Space Station

— Thursday, April 21 / 7:30pm
— Admission $10
— Jared Sorensen, game designer

You wake up inside the cramped confines of a cryosleep chamber. You feel weak and dizzy from a prolonged period in cryonic suspension. What will you do next? Join game designer Jared Sorensen and the Charles Hayden Planetarium team as we break new ground in the Planetarium dome. Inspired by the text-parsing games of the ’80s, Space Station allows the entire audience to play a single character trying to survive a dangerous situation… in space! Give commands, explore rooms, examine objects, and try to escape the Space Station, if you can!

Check out the Parsely website for more information about their series of text-based adventure games.

Tickets on sale beginning January 28 /// (January 26 for Museum members)
Part of the Cambridge Science Festival.


CosmicLoops-IanEthanCase
Image Source: David Rabkin

Cosmic Loops

— Wednesday, May 18 / 7:15pm
— Admission $15
— Ian Ethan Case, acoustic double-neck guitars, fretless guitar, live looping | Stephanie Case, live sound design | Bertram Lehmann, percussion | Jeff Willet, gongs and percussion

As you soar through nebulas, galaxies, and star systems in the immersive space under the dome of the Charles Hayden Planetarium, live music with simple beginnings builds layer upon layer into an intricate universe of musical loops created by masters of an evocative style. Acoustic double-neck guitarist Ian Ethan fluidly combines a staggering variety of self-invented playing techniques necessitated by his multilayered compositions, further expanded using real-time live looping technology. Indulge in this rare quartet performance in which gongs and exotic percussion instruments from around the world take Ian’s latest compositions into new dimensions, with the Planetarium team’s transcendent visions overhead.

Tickets on sale beginning January 28 /// (January 26 for Museum members)

Using Real Pluto Imagery – From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA

In producing From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA we made the exciting but perilous decision to include the New Horizons mission within our story. So we made an early bet that the mission would be a success…

As you well know, New Horizons has given us an amazing close-up look at Pluto. And so we are excited to announce that we have updated the show to include the latest real images of Pluto and Charon!

Collection of 360° Video Rigs

360-video-rig-collection

360° video is growing by leaps and bounds. There is no doubt about it.

And it’s fascinating to see all the different approaches to capturing 360° video. So I surveyed the current 360° video rigs being offered and then organized every serious option into this epic listing. The results are telling…

If you’re new to 360 video, then you have much to wrap your mind around. I suggest checking out my blog post: 360 Video Fundamentals. Or to gain a comprehensive understanding check out the Making360 open source book.

CATEGORIES
Comparison of 360° Video Rig Categories
360° Video Rigs
360° Video Rigs: Stereoscopic
360° Video Rigs: Scuba Diving
360° Video Rigs: First-Person POV
360° Video Rigs: Invisible Drone
Partial 360° Video Rigs
Cylindrical Video Rigs
Cylindrical Video Rigs: Stereoscopic
Cylindrical Video Rigs: Parabolic Mirror
360° Light Field Rigs
360° Photography Rigs
Fisheye Video Rigs
Fisheye Video Rigs: Stereoscopic
360° Video Rigs: Less than 30fps
360° Video Rigs: Wild and Unique
360° Video Rigs: DIY 3D Printing
Unsuccessful Kickstarter Projects
History of 360° Film

Updated on February 9, 2016


Comparison of 360° Video Rig Categories

There are many different types of 360° video rigs, but not all of them capture the full 360×180° field of view (FOV). And so I’ve placed each rig into a specific category. Sometimes you don’t need to capture absolutely everything. It all depends on how you’re going to use the footage.

For instance, if you’re using a tripod then perhaps you could ignore that footage zone (partial 360°). Maybe the main focus is happening along the horizon, then you might not need to capture the sky and immediate ground (cylindrical). Or maybe you just need to capture the events happening directly in front of you (fisheye). Or maybe you want the big challenge, capturing 3D depth (stereoscopic).

Below I’ve outlined the typical FOV coverage of each rig category: 360°, partial 360°, cylindrical, and fisheye. But these are just averaged examples of each category, sometimes there are outliers which have much higher or lower FOV.

comparison-of-360-video-rig-categories-20151118
Source Image by Andrey Salnikov: “Climbing Volcano Teide”


360° Video Rigs

These rigs capture monoscopic 360° video. A majority of producers are currently shooting with these rigs.

360Heros: PRO6
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
360Heros-Pro6

Freedom360: Freedom360 Mount
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
Freedom360-Freedom360-Mount

Freedom360: F360 Explorer
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
— all weather
Freedom360-F360-Explorer

360Heros: 360H6
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
— all weather
360heros-360h6-rig

360Heros: PRO7
— full coverage: 360×180°, 7 GoPro cameras
360Heros-Pro7

360Heros: PRO10HD
— full coverage:  360×180°, 10 GoPro cameras
360Heros-H3Pro10HD

Freedom360: Elmo360
— full coverage: 360×180°, 4 Elmo cameras
— all weather
Freedom360-Elmo360

Elmo: QBiC Panorama
— full coverage: 360×180°, 4 Elmo cameras
— all weather
Elmo-QBiC-Panorama

iZugar: Z2X
— full coverage: 360×180°, 2 GoPro cameras with custom 194° fisheye lens
iZugar-Z2X

iZugar: Z3X
— full coverage: 360×180°, 3 GoPro cameras with custom 185° fisheye lens
iZugar-Z3X

iZugar: Z4X
— full coverage: 360×180°, 4 GoPro cameras with custom 185° fisheye lens
iZugar-Z4X

Sphericam 2
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 6 sensors
Sphericam-2

Bublcam
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 4 sensors (190° fisheye lens)
Bublcam-Rig

Nikon KeyMission 360
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (fisheye lens)
— can go underwater up to 30m or 100ft
Nikon-KeyMission360

Ricoh: Theta S
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (190° fisheye lens)
Ricoh-Theta-S

Kodak: PIXPRO SP360 – Double Base Mount
— full coverage: 360×180°, 2 PIXPRO SP360 cameras
Kodak--PixPro-SP360-4k_Double-Base-Mount

Panorics: PTRig
— full coverage: 360×180°, 3 GoPro cameras with custom 185° fisheye lens
Panorics-PTRig

Luna
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (190° fisheye lens)
Luna-360-camera

Insta360 4k
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (230° fisheye lens)
Insta360-4k


360° Video Rigs: Stereoscopic

Stereoscopic rigs allows for 360° video to be captured for both your left and right eyes. So a true sense of depth can be achieved in VR. But there are many challenges that make it difficult to shoot in stereo and not give the viewer a very frustrating experience. (Example problems include: parallax error differences between eyes, exposure differences between eyes, genlocking cameras, getting complete stereo coverage without ignoring the poles, and such big headaches. The terms stereoscopic, 3D, and S-3D can be used interchangeably.

360Heros: 3DPRO12
— full coverage: 360×180°, 12 GoPro cameras
360Heros-3DH3Pro12

360Heros: 3DPRO12H
— full coverage: 360×180°, 12 GoPro cameras
360Heros-3DH3Pro12H

360Heros: 3DPRO14H
— full coverage: 360×180°, 14 GoPro cameras
360Heros-3DH3Pro14H

iZugar: Z6X3D
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras with custom 194° fisheye lens
iZugar-Z6X3D

Vuze
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 8 sensors
vuze-3d-360-camera

Nokia: OZO
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 8 sensors (195° fisheye lens)
Nokia-OZO

Jaunt: ONE J1-24G / J1-24R
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 24 sensors
Jaunt-ONE

NextVR: Digital Cinema Camera
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, 6 EPIC-M RED Dragon cameras
NextVR-Digital-Cinema-Camera

HypeVR
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, 14 EPIC-M RED Dragon cameras
— Velodyne’s HDL-32E to collect LiDAR data
HypeVR-Rig

Radiant Images: Codex ActionCam VR 360 Blossom
— full coverage: 360×180°, 17 Codex ActionCam cameras
Radiant-Images-Codex-ActionCam-VR-360-Blossom

Samsung: Project Beyond
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 17 sensors
Samsung-Project-Beyond

360 Designs: EYE
— full coverage: 360×180°, 8 to 42 cameras depending on configuration: Blackmagic Design Micro Cinema Camera (self-contained) or Blackmagic Design Micro Studio Camera 4k (wired operation)
Mini EYE also available (4 to 11 cameras)
360-Designs-EYE

WeMakeVR: Falcon VR Camera
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 14 sensors
WeMakeVR-Falcon-VR-Camera

Panocam3D: POD
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 18 sensors
Panocam-HMC

Problems with Stereoscopic 360° Video
360 Stereo Consumer Cameras?
The problem of 3D spherical video
Camera Circles for Stereo Spherical Video
Stereo Polygons
3-camera zenith for better 3D


360° Video Rigs: Scuba Diving

To take a 360° video rig underwater, you can’t simply put it within a glass box… The lens optics would be affected by the refraction of the water. So these rigs have built-in compensation and allow you to capture 360° without any problems.

360Heros: 360Abyss
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
— can go underwater up to 1000m or 3280ft, negative/positive/neutral buoyancy (anodized or poly carbonate versions)
overview of the v4 redesign
360Heros-360Abyss

Kolor: Abyss
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
— can go underwater up to 150m or 492ft, (anodized aluminum alloy)
Kolor-Abyss-Rig

360Heros: H3ScubaH6
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
— can go underwater up to of 61m or 200ft
360Heros-H3ScubaH6


360° Video Rigs: First-Person POV

To tell the story from a first-person point of view, you have to be within their head. These rigs allow you to see though the actors eyes and capture their body movements too.

Radiant Images: Mobius POV VR 360
— full coverage: 360×180°, 17 GoPro cameras
Radiant-Images-Mobius-POV-VR-360

Panocam3D: HMC
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 24 sensors
— stereoscopic
Panocam3D-HMC


360° Video Rigs: Invisible Drone

Attaching a 360° video rig to a drone is easy. But allowing the drone itself to be hidden within the shot is a special trick.

360Heros: 360 Orb
— full coverage: 360×180°, 12 GoPro cameras
360Heros-360Orb


Partial 360° Video Rigs

These rigs are definitely thought of as 360° video because they capture the entire sky and horizon, but the ground isn’t captured (often the tripod).

Freedom360: F360 Broadcaster
— partial coverage: 360×140°, 6 GoPro cameras
Freedom360-F360-Broadcaster

360Heros: PRO6L
— partial coverage: 360×120°, 6 GoPro cameras
360Heros-H3Pro6N

Totavision: Fulldome Camera
— partial coverage: 360×110°, 11 Toshiba IK-HD1 cameras
Totavision-Fulldome-Camera

Sphericam 1
— partial coverage: 360×138°, single camera body with 4 sensors (170° fisheye lens)
Sphericam-1

Immersive Media: Hex
— partial coverage: 360×144°, single camera body with 6 sensors
— 15fps at full resolution / 25fps at half resolution
Immersive-Media-Hex

Giroptic 360 Cam
— partial coverage: 360×150°, single camera body with 3 sensors (185° fisheye lens)
Giroptic-360-Cam

PanoptikonVR
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, 14 GoPro cameras
— stereoscopic
PanoptikonVR


Cylindrical Video Rigs

These rigs only capture the horizon. So the sky and the ground are not captured. (But there are some tricks to fill in these empty areas, such as heavily blurring some of footage and stretching into this zone. Or taking a still photo prior to the shoot and patching it in later.)

360Heros: H3Pro7HD
— partial coverage: 360×120°, 7 GoPro cameras
360Heros-H3Pro7HD

Immersive Media: Quattro
— partial coverage: exact FOV unknown, single camera body with 4 sensors
— 15fps max
Immersive-Media-Quattro

Totavision: Cylindrical Camera
— partial coverage: 360×37°, 8 Toshiba IK-HD1 cameras
Totavision-Cylindrical-CameraPalace of Versailles footage / making-of


Cylindrical Video Rigs: Stereoscopic

These rigs only capture the horizon in stereo. So the sky and the ground are not captured. This approach makes dealing with stereo challenges much easier to swallow.

GoPro: Odyssey / Google Jump
— partial coverage: 360×120°, 16 GoPro cameras
— custom stitching service in the Google cloud: The Assembler
GoPro-Odyssey_Google-Jump


Cylindrical Video Rigs: Parabolic Mirror

This technique has been around for a while. Basically one camera is precisely aimed at a specially crafted parabolic mirror. And so the mirror warps the whole horizon into the camera lens. But the sky and the ground are not captured. Since it only uses one camera, your end resolution is limited… But you don’t have to do any stitching. (Other problems include: dust magnet, mirror surface quality, irregularly warping of image, and flares.)

ActionCam360
— partial coverage: 360×90°, attachment for GoPro housing
— all weather
ActionCam360

Eye Mirror: GP 360
— partial coverage: exact FOV unknown, attachment for GoPro housing
— can go underwater up to 50m or 165ft
eye-mirror-gp360

Pano Pro MKII
— partial coverage: 360×120°, lens for a DSLR
Pano-Pro-MKII

0-360 Panoramic Optic
— partial coverage: 360×115°, lens for a DSLR
0-360-Panoramic-Optic

Eye Mirror
— partial coverage: exact FOV unknown, lens for a DSLR
Eye-Mirror

GoPano: Plus
— partial coverage: 360×100°, lens for a DSLR
GoPano-Plus

Eye Mirror: Wet Lens
— partial coverage: exact FOV unknown, lens for a DSLR
— can go underwater (depth rating unknown)
eyemirror-wet-lens

Kogeto: Joey
— partial coverage: exact FOV unknown, single camera body with 1 sensor
Kogeto-Jo

Kogeto: Lucy
— partial coverage: 360×100°, single camera body with 1 sensor
in-depth experimentation
Kogeto-Lucy

VSN Mobil: V.360
— partial coverage: 360×60°, single camera body with 1 sensor
VSN-Mobil-V360

Kogeto: Dot
— partial coverage: 360×63°, attachment for iPhone
Kogeto-Dot

GoPano: Micro
— partial coverage: 360×82°, attachment for iPhone
GoPano-micro

Remote Reality: Hummingbird360
— partial coverage: 360×70°, attachment for PointGrey Flea3 or Grasshopper
Remote-Reality-Hummingbird360


360° Light Field Rigs

A 360° light field camera enables virtual views to be generated from any point, facing any direction, with any field of view. Meaning that you can experience Six Degrees of Freedom (6DoF), and you can actually lean into the shot and change your perspective. It is the holy grail of VR.

Lytro: Immerge
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, dense light field camera array
presentation by Jon Karafin (Head of Light Field Video for Lytro)
Lytro-Immerge

Interesting Research
OTOY 360 light field experiment
Axial-Cones: Modeling Spherical Catadioptric Cameras for Wide-Angle Light Field Rendering


360° Photography Rigs

There are a bunch of techniques to capture a 360° photo. But here are some photography rigs which automate or simplify the process.

Panono
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 36 sensors
Panono

NCTech: iris360
— partial coverage: 360×137.5°, single camera body with 4 sensors
NCTech-iris360

PanoHero
— full coverage: 360×180°, 1 GoPro camera
— Stereo version available
PanoHero

Squito
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, single camera body with 3 sensors
Squito

GigaPan: Epic
— Motorized drive which automatically captures multi-gigapixel panoramas
GigaPan-Epic

Roundshot: VR Drive
— Motorized drive which automatically captures multi-gigapixel panoramas
Roundshot-VR-Drive

360° Photography Guides
How To Get Started on 360° Panoramic Photography
Guide to Panoramic Photography
360×180 Panorama Documentation


Fisheye Video Rigs

Shooting with a fisheye lens means that you’re capturing at least 180° and it’s being projected onto the camera sensor in a circular format. Fisheye footage can be projected directly into a dome and be instantly immersive. But it can also be easily converted into the equirectangular format (spherical).

Kodak: PIXPRO SP360
— camera with built-in 214° fisheye lens
— can go underwater up to 60m or 197ft (with case accessory)
Kodak-PixPro-SP360

Kodak: PIXPRO SP360 4k
— camera with built-in 235° fisheye lens
— can go underwater up to 60m or 197ft (with case accessory)
Kodak-PixPro-SP360-4k

360Fly
— camera with built-in 240° fisheye lens
— can go underwater up to 50m or 165ft
360fly

Entaniya: Fisheye Lenses
— custom lenses for GoPro cameras with the Back-Bone Ribcage modification
— lenses available at 220°, 250°, 280°
Entaniya-Fisheye-Lenses-220-250-280

Dome3D: GP185
— GoPro camera with custom 185° fisheye lens
Dome3D-GP185

Entaniya: Entapano C-01
— camera with built-in 183° fisheye lens
Entaniya-Entapano-C-01

Entaniya: Entapano2
— camera with built-in 250° fisheye lens
Entaniya-Entapano2

Digital Cinema Camera Options
— RED Scarlet with fisheye lens experiments: Paul Bourke & Home Run Pictures
— Below is a slide from the presentation: “Seeking the Ideal Fulldome Camera” by Jim Arthurs – (IMERSA Summit 2013)
IMERSA2013-SeekingTheIdealFulldomeCamera-JimArthurs

Photojojo: Fisheye Lens – attachment for iPhone/Android
— custom 180° or 235° fisheye lens options – photo mode: partially cropped fisheye image / video mode: fully cropped fisheye image
Photojojo-Fisheye-Lens

Lomography: Fisheye One / Fisheye Submarine
— 35mm film camera with built-in 170° fisheye lens: partially cropped fisheye image
— can go underwater up to 20m or 65ft
Lomography-Fisheye-One


Fisheye Video Rigs: Stereoscopic

Shooting with a fisheye lens means that you’re capturing at least 180° and it’s being projected onto the camera sensor in a circular format. But if you shoot with fisheye lenses that are higher than 180°, then you will see the lens itself within the edges of the shots. There are tricks to deal with this, but it’s an interesting challenge.

IX Image: Omnipolar Camera Rig
— 3 cameras with fisheye lens
custom stitching solution to enable stereo stitching without pole region issues
— potential to create 360° video (3 cams facing up, 3 cams facing down)
IX-Image-Omnipolar-Camera-Rig

Lucid Cam
— single camera body with 2 sensors (180° fisheye lens)
Prototype adapter allows for 360° stereoscopic video
Lucid-Cam

Tutorial
Building a 3D Camera: Wide-Angle Stereoscopic Video for Cinematic Virtual Reality


360° Video Rigs: Less than 30fps

For VR and domes, a capture rate of at least 30 frames per seconds is an absolute requirement. Anything less and it’s simply too hard of an experience for the viewer.

Ricoh: Theta m15
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (180° fisheye lens)
— 15fps, 5 minutes max of video recording
teardown of camera
Ricoh-Theta-m15

Point Grey: Ladybug5
— partial coverage: 360×162°, single camera body with 6 sensors
— 5fps uncompressed / 10fps compressed
in-depth experimentation
Point-Grey-Ladybug5

Point Grey: Ladybug3
— partial coverage: 360×144°, single camera body with 6 sensors
— 6.5fps uncompressed / 16fps compressed
Point-Grey-Ladybug3

Point Grey: Ladybug2
— partial coverage: 360×135°, single camera body with 6 sensors
— 15fps uncompressed / 30fps compressed
Point-Grey-Ladybug2

ALLie
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (188° fisheye lens)
— 22fps
allie_camera

VideoPanoramas
— partial coverage: 360×162°, single camera body with 3 sensors
— 10 FPS at 5MP / 15 FPS at 3MP / 30 FPS at 1.3MP
VideoPanoramas


360° Video Rigs: Wild and Unique

In my research I’ve stumbled across many unique camera systems. Many of which are fascinating but are either not being used anymore, defy categorization, currently a prototype, or perhaps was a singular creation.

Immersive Media: Dodeca 2360 /// more info
The original cube from Freedom360
Fraunhofer HHI: OmniCam-360 and 3D OmniCam
Elphel Eyesis4Pi
Canon Vixia / 24 camera rig
Overview One
Panoptic Camera
FullView Camera Rig
Intel Realsense Drone
The Mill – Custom Red Dragon Camera Rig
ADAPA Trino
FascinatE’s Omnicam ARRI Alexa M Rig
IC720
Occam Omni Stereo
Panasonic Dive
Pentax Prototype
Live Capture Using Panoramic Photography with One Camera
6 GoPro Cameras with six Entaniya fisheye lenses
360 video using five Canon M cameras
Calibration of Omnidirectional Cameras in Practice
TENGO2VR Q-1 Mark II
GoPro Cylindrical Helmet Rig
360 Video Helmet Rig
Homemade Helmet Rig
Pi Of Sauron – 3D Printed, Raspberry Pi 360 Video Rig
Making VR Video with the Kodak PIXPRO SP360
Spherecam
Mobius 360
GoPro Session Rig
Disposable film camera for cylindrical capture
ADAPA: Nimbus VR
ADAPA: Pulsar VR 360 video camera rigvideo
Aposematic Jacket
Polar Effect: Philon 360 stabilized camera rig (working prototype)video
Nodal Ninja Multi-Cam Pano bracket system
3D printed Xiaomi Yi Rig
GoPro Session: 3D printed rig
Shooting 360° Video in 48K Using 12 Sony Xperia Z5 Smartphones
Nikon Multi-Ball (prototype)
Custom 3D 360 Rig using 13 Xiaomi Cameras
360 rig using six Flare 4KSDI cameras
Tripletcam
ALLie Go
Genlocked GoPro Rig – tested with fast moving footage
10 Camera Canon Vixia / RC car rig
GoPro Omni announcement
Ricoh Theta S and The Beholder gimbal rig /// example footage
CUBE360 GVT100M – max 28fps / 190° fisheye camera
GO6D camera


360° Video Rigs: DIY 3D Printing

So 360° video isn’t hard enough for you? You want to 3D print your own rig too?

Purple Pill VR – 3D models for 360 mono, 360 stereo, Google Jump
Thingiverse: Cylindrical Stereo Mobius Rig /// in-depth experimentation
Thingiverse: Collection of 360 video rigs
Thingiverse: search for 360 video rigs
Shapeways: search for 360 video rigs
SJ4000 360 Rig
IncreDesigns


Unsuccessful Kickstarter Projects

Sadly these Kickstarter projects weren’t funded since they didn’t reach their goal. But they are unique and deserve to be recognized.

Blocks Camera
— modular camera rig with 4 sensors
Blocks-Camera

Centr Cam
— partial coverage: 360×56, single camera body with 4 sensors
Centr-Cam

Shot
— iPhone attachment with dual 235° fisheye lenses
Shot-iPhone-attachment


History of 360° Film

The concept of capturing a huge panoramic perspective isn’t a new one. There are been some fascinating projects early in film history. And only now is that dream being fully realized.

Early Cylindrical Film History
Cinéorama (1900 Paris Exposition)
Lumière Photorama (1902)
Circarama (Disneyland)

Early 360° Video
Page of Omnidirectional Vision
Dynamic Surround Video
Shooting 360-degree video with four GoPro HD Hero cameras
Canon 5D Mark II fisheye rig

360Heros-HungryShark
Photo Source

Blueprint to Blastoff: Free Engineering Materials for the Planetarium or Classroom

Talia-Bio-PhotoWe are offering 3 distinct educational modules, focusing on aspects of spacecraft engineering, to anyone with a planetarium or classroom who would like to use them. They supplement, but are independent of our newest show From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA and are being shared free of charge.

This article was written by Talia Sepersky. She currently works as a planetarium educator at the Charles Hayden Planetarium, Museum of Science, Boston.

SECTIONS
Intro: Putting the “E” back in “STEM”
Module 1: Fixing the Hubble Space Telescope
Module 2: Gravity And Space Travel
Module 3: Design a Mission
The Guides
Acquiring The Modules And Guides
Teacher Bundles


Intro: Putting the “E” back in “STEM”

When it comes to STEM, planetarium shows tend to be very good at covering the science, technology, and even the math portions, but engineering often gets left out. To help fill this void, in 2013 we, the staff of the Charles Hayden Planetarium at the Museum of Science, Boston, teamed up with NASA to make a planetarium show about spacecraft engineering. The result of this partnership is the show “From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA,” which explores what it takes to design, test, build, and fly a successful space mission.

As much as we would have liked to, we could not talk in detail about every part of spacecraft engineering during the show. However, through the partnership with NASA, we were able to expand on a few engineering topics from the show in three separate, supplementary education modules. We are extremely pleased to be able to offer these modules to anyone who wants to use them completely free of charge.

The modules themselves have three very different lengths, styles, and topics, and are designed to be presented in different ways. They can be used on a planetarium dome, and a flatscreen version permits their use on a conventional screen as well. Although each goes into depth on topics that are raised in “From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA,” they all stand on their own and require no knowledge of the show itself. The three modules are: “Fixing the Hubble Space Telescope”, “Gravity and Space Travel”, and “Design a Mission”.


Module 1: Fixing the Hubble Space Telescope

We’ve found that many people in our audiences know that there was something wrong with Hubble when it launched, and that it was eventually fixed. However, few people tend to be aware of the details. The first of our modules, “Fixing the Hubble Space Telescope,” goes into some of those details. It’s the most straightforward of the three modules, consisting of a single video approximately eight minutes long. Large portions of the narration are undertaken by Dr. Jeffrey Hoffman, a former astronaut who flew on the first Hubble servicing mission.

With this module we wanted to focus on a specific case of spacecraft engineering, and Hubble Servicing Mission 1 provides a fantastic real life example. We also wanted to bring in the idea that failures can be instructive.

This module starts by introducing Hubble in space, and then describing how astronomers realized the telescope had a flaw, using some of Hubble’s earliest observations to make the point. It then takes Hubble apart to show the primary mirror and allow Dr. Hoffman to describe exactly what went wrong with making it.

While still looking at a cutaway view of Hubble, Dr. Hoffman goes on to explain the “fix” designed by engineers to repair Hubble, describing the arrangement of mirrors that allowed light entering Hubble’s tube to be refocused before landing on the detection instruments. While he is providing the narration, the visuals show this in action, following a light path all the way through Hubble to the instruments.

The module then moves on to the installation of the new optics on Hubble, with Dr. Hoffman talking about the work on the shuttle mission. This is accompanied by visuals of Hubble and the space shuttle in space, as well as actual video clips from the mission. In one of our favorite parts of this module, Dr. Hoffman shares his story of receiving the phone call that let him know the fix had worked, as well as some thoughts on what it felt like to actually touch Hubble. Some of the visuals for this portion include Hubble images, comparing pictures of the same objects before and after the repair.

The module concludes with the idea that we can learn from failures like Hubble’s. To quote Dr. Hoffman at the module’s end, “The important thing, though, is if you do have a failure, you really need to be able to learn from it. To have a failure that you don’t learn anything from, that’s tragic.”


Module 2: Gravity And Space Travel

It turns out that describing what goes on during a gravity assist can be tricky business. This module introduces some of the mechanics of the momentum transfer that happens during a gravity assist maneuver through Earth-based and space-based examples, as well as describing some of the various ways gravity assists can be used in a space mission.

Since gravity assists can be a tough subject to teach and the depth a presenter goes into will vary widely with different audiences, we designed this module to be as flexible as possible. It is broken up into five segments, each about 1-2 minutes in length (for a total of about 7 minutes of video). Each segment can be presented independently of the others if the presenter only wants to use some but not all. They can also follow after each other, with each segment building on the one before.

We created this format with the idea of using live interpretations in between each of the segments, to reiterate or emphasize the content covered in the previous segment and set up for the next one. However—maximum flexibility!—they can also be strung together to create one unbroken video, depending on the presenter’s preferred style. The core ideas behind momentum transfer and gravity assists are presented in segments 2 and 3, so our recommendation is that at least these two be used.

Segment 1 is relatively straightforward. It starts with the idea that spacecraft travel is often not as easy as pointing the spacecraft at its destination and giving it a push. It introduces the terms “gravity assist” and “momentum transfer” and also defines the word “momentum.”

Segment 2’s purpose is to help the audience gain a better understand of the transfer of momentum using an Earth-based example. To this end, we enlisted the help of a local roller derby team. We wanted to emphasize the idea that gravity assists work not just because the planets are large (i.e. have a lot of gravity) but because they are also moving (i.e. have a lot of momentum).

For this, we had one skater (designated Skater One) hold still and whip her teammates around her as they approach. While her teammates’ paths change, their speed remains more or less the same. We then recreated the same scenario with Skater One also in motion. This time, when she whips her teammates around, their speed increases noticeably even as Skater One’s decreases, due to the momentum transfer between them.

Segment 3 builds on the Earth-based example with a space-based one, specifically the New Horizons gravity assist flyby of Jupiter in February 2007. It starts by looking at what would have happened if New Horizons had gone directly from Earth to Pluto, then looks at the Jupiter flyby. The visuals show an overhead view of New Horizons approaching Jupiter and then visibly increasing its speed as it flies past. This segment uses some actual numbers to get across how much momentum Jupiter has to spare and to emphasize the fact that the planet is, for all practical purposes, not actually affected by losing some. It ends by describing the changes in New Horizons’ speed and flight time as a result of the flyby.

Since Segment 3 presents how a gravity assist can be used to speed a spacecraft up, Segment 4 explores how one can be used to slow a spacecraft down. It shows how the angle at which a spacecraft approaches a planet determines whether the planet transfers momentum to the spacecraft (to speed the spacecraft up) or the spacecraft transfers momentum to the planet (to slow the spacecraft down). It also re-emphasizes the idea that, no matter what the spacecraft does, it will have no practical effect on the planet.

The final segment, Segment 5, brings up the use of multiple gravity assists in a single mission, requiring careful planning many years in advance. To conclude, it loops back to the idea raised in Segment 1 that many space missions are only possible with the use of gravity assists (showing some of the rather convoluted paths these missions took), and that by making clever use of them we have vastly expanded our knowledge of the Solar System.


Module 3: Design a Mission

The “Design a Mission” module is the most interactive of the three and requires a live presentation. In this activity the audience, using information provided to them by the presenter, designs a spacecraft to search for signs of water in the Solar System. They have to choose a destination and then, based on that destination, a power source and whether their spacecraft will be a lander or orbiter. If they design their spacecraft well to suit their destination, the mission will succeed. If they do not, the mission will fail (and how it fails depends on the spacecraft design).

The module itself is made up of thirteen video clips to incorporate all the possible outcomes of the audience’s decisions. In total, the video clips make up about 35 minutes of footage, but a presenter should only need a fraction of that during any given presentation.

The first clip represents the audience’s first decision: will their spacecraft travel to Mars or Saturn in search of evidence of water? The visual for this clip is fairly basic, with images of both of those planets on the screen.

Once they’ve chosen the destination, the second clip represents the audience’s next decision: will the spacecraft be an orbiter or a lander? The presenter may want to provide the audience with some of the benefits and disadvantages of each, or ask the audience to come up with some on their own. The visual is of the two different styles of spacecraft. The “lander” option is based roughly on Cassini with a Huygens-style lander attached to its side.

The third decision is whether to make the spacecraft solar or nuclear-powered, and there are two clips that can potentially be used depending on whether the audience chose an orbiter or a lander. If they chose “lander,” the corresponding clip shows two versions of the lander-style spacecraft, one with solar panels and one without (the nuclear reactor is visible on the bottom edge of the nuclear-powered spacecraft, but is small and not immediately obvious like the solar panels). If they chose “orbiter” the visual is the same, with the orbiter-style spacecraft instead. Again, the presenter may want to make sure the audience knows the benefits and drawbacks of each choice.


Now that they have designed their spacecraft, it’s time to send it to the chosen planet and see if it succeeds. There are eight different clips to represent the eight possible outcomes of the audience’s choices. All start with a liftoff from Earth and a view of the spacecraft moving towards its destination. What happens once it starts moving depends on how well the spacecraft was designed.

The four Mars scenarios (nuclear orbiter, nuclear lander, solar orbiter, and solar lander) all succeed. The two lander scenarios make use of the landing sequence of the Curiosity rover for visuals. The landers will find evidence for water in the form of “blueberries,” frost, and silica deposits. The orbiters will find evidence of water from seeing river channels, hydrogen deposits, and rampart craters.




It’s much harder to succeed at Saturn, and only one scenario, the nuclear-powered orbiter, will lead to success. If the audience chose a solar-powered spacecraft, then as it moves through space towards Saturn the picture will turn to static to represent the spacecraft losing power and shutting down. If they chose a nuclear-powered lander, they will see a rather stunning sequence of their lander entering the atmosphere, heating up, and exploding. If they chose a nuclear-powered orbiter, they will find evidence of water in the geysers on Enceladus and in Saturn’s E Ring.




Since not all of the mission designs succeed, the presenter may wish to talk about failure in spacecraft engineering. To this end, we wanted to show audiences that the professionals also sometimes don’t get it right. The final clip shows images from four real life failed missions from different countries, specifically the Vanguard rocket, the Mars Climate Orbiter, the Phobos-Grunt mission, and the Akatsuki mission. As with the end of the “Fixing Hubble” module, the idea is to emphasize that failures happen, and that the important thing is to learn from them when they do.


The Guides

Between them, these three modules present a lot of information, some of it very specific. To make them as easy as possible for a large variety of institutions to use, we’ve also created planetarian guides to go with each. Our hope is that a presenter with no background in any of these three topics can make an effective presentation on any or all of them using just the material found in the corresponding planetarian guide. In addition to the script for the module, a set of FAQs, and a glossary, each guide contains copious background information as well as some suggestions for presentation.

The “Fixing Hubble” guide includes a layout of Hubble’s optics, even more detail about the flaw and how it was fixed, a brief breakdown of each of NASA’s Hubble servicing missions, and a list of Hubble specifications.

The “Gravity and Space Travel” guide goes into greater detail about the mechanics of gravity assists, how momentum is transferred, and why the spacecraft’s trajectory changes. It also looks at the usefulness of gravity assists on specific missions and provides a list of missions that have made notable uses of gravity assists. In the script section, it provides some guidelines for live interpretation in between the video segments as well instructions on how to recreate the roller skater demo from Segment 2 in house, using either staff or audience members.

The “Design a Mission” guide includes specific descriptions of each of the visuals in the clips and what they are designed to represent. There is an outline for the progression of the module, with some guidelines for discussion, background information on the pros and cons of landers, orbiters, solar power, and nuclear power, and a description of why each mission succeeds or fails. There is also a list of all of the video clips included with this module.

Separate from the planetarian guides, there is a set of educator guides for teachers using the modules in a standard classroom setting. The educator guides are geared more towards using the modules as part of a lesson in a school environment rather than a presentation in a planetarium show, and the information they include is not as detailed as that in the planetarian guides. There are also educator guides for topics not included in the modules, including “Waves and Information Transfer” and “Infrared Astronomy,” which also expand a bit on topics raised in the show “From Dream to Discovery.”


Engineering In The Dome

In covering some of the nitty-gritty details of designing a space mission, these modules can serve as a good foundation for introducing engineering in the dome or classroom. We anticipate that different venues will find diverse creative ways of using these resources (and we’d love to hear how they’re being used!). It is our hope that many different institutions will find our modules helpful, and that they will help engineering take its rightful place in the planetarium space.


Acquiring The Modules And Guides

To ensure that many different institutions, classrooms, and other settings can make use of our modules, we are offering them in a variety of formats. The modules are all available in 1K, 2K, and 4K fulldome versions for planetarium domes. There are also flat versions available for use in standard classrooms or for anyone using a flatscreen projector (complete with captions).

The 1k download links are immediately available. We simply ask that anyone downloading from the website fill out a brief survey to help us understand how the modules are being used in different settings.

If you’re interested in 2k or 4k domemasters, then please email us for more information: fulldome@mos.org


Teacher Bundles

The Teacher Bundles for “Fixing Hubble” and “Gravity Assist” include the flatscreen captioned versions of the modules as well as the educator guides. The classroom version of “Design a Mission” is web-based, so the Teacher Bundle for that module includes the educator guide and link to the web-based activity. The modules page also includes a Teacher Bundle with the “Waves and Information Transfer” and “Infrared Astronomy” educator guides.


Copyright 2015 International Planetarium Society; article used with permission.

This material is based upon work supported by NASA under grant number NNX12AL19G. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed are those of the Museum of Science, Boston and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

DJ Spooky: The Hidden Code – Performing in the Dome

My love for live music in the dome is undeniable. The idea is simple but powerful: Allow the synthesis of live performance and astronomy visuals to create a uniquely awe-inspiring experience.

Having thrown a series of live music events, each with its own custom dome visuals, we now have a collection of 4k dome material. So when DJ Spooky approached us with the idea of partnering to create a live fulldome show, it felt like a natural match. And the premiere of the show is just a few weeks away.

DJ Spooky: The Hidden Code — tickets
Performing at the Charles Hayden Planetarium, Museum of Science
Thursday, September 24, 2015 — 7:00–9:00 pm

DJSpookyLive_TheHiddenCode


Now Booking Dome Performances

After the premiere of the album and fulldome show is when things get interesting for you. DJ Spooky is looking for domes to perform in! For live bookings please contact Sozo.

We have also created a canned version of the show which is meant to compete with evening laser shows. If you’re interested in licensing the show, then please contact me.

4k Fulldome Show Optionsfulldome trailer
— Live performance (visuals split by song)
— Canned show (45 minute show)

Flat Theater Options [16:9 ratio]flat trailer
— Live performance (visuals split by song)
— Canned show (45 minute show)


More Info About The Hidden Code Album

Imagine a visual odyssey through the cosmos, driven by lush musical compositions and inspired by complex themes of astronomy, engineering, biology, and psychology. The Hidden Code is the newest work by Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky. Commissioned by Dartmouth College’s Neukom Institute for Computational Science, Miller composed the album based on conversations with several of Dartmouth’s leading researchers.

The album features Dartmouth theoretical physicist and saxophonist Stephon Alexander; and Dartmouth physicist and author Marcelo Gleiser who reads his original poetry.

Check out the free online streaming of The Hidden Code album.

Savor this synthesis of emerging science, poetry, and melody with immersive visions overhead as The Hidden Code pushes art into science. Science into music. Music into art.

Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky, is a composer, music producer, performer, multimedia artist and National Geographic Emerging Explorer. He has collaborated with an array of recording artists, from Metallica and Chuck D to Steve Reich and Yoko Ono. He is the author of Imaginary App, Rhythm Science, Sound Unbound and Book of Ice.

Stephon Alexander is a theoretical physicist, tenor saxophonist and recording artist. He specializes in cosmology, particle physics and quantum gravity. He is the Ernest Everett Just 1907 Professor of Natural Sciences at Dartmouth and a National Geographic Emerging Explorer.

Marcelo Gleiser is a theoretical physicist specializing in particle cosmology. He is the author of The Island of Knowledge, A Tear at the Edge of Creation, The Prophet and the Astronomer, and The Dancing Universe. He is the founder of NPR’s blog 13.7 on science and culture. He is the Appleton Professor of Natural Philosophy and Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Dartmouth.

TheHiddenCode_ShowPoster


Press

NPR – The Hidden Code: An Embrace Of Art And Science
Sound of Boston – Interview
Dartmouth – DJ Spooky Album Explores Universe With Dartmouth Scientists

Dome Screening at SIGGRAPH 2015

Our short fulldome film Waiting Far Away has been selected to be screened during SIGGRAPH 2015! So if you will be attending then please check it out.

Scheduled within the Art Reel: Part 1 sessions:
— Monday, Aug 10 /// 10:45am-11:00am
— Tuesday, Aug 11 /// 12:45pm-1:00pm
— Tuesday, Aug 11 /// 3:45pm-4:00pm
— Wednesday, Aug 12 /// 12:45pm-1:00pm
— Wednesday, Aug 12 /// 4:45pm-5:00pm
— Thursday, Aug 13 /// 12:45pm-1:00pm

The VR Village Dome will be in Exhibit Hall G in the South Building of the Los Angeles Convention Center.

Cycle – Fulldome Short

Cycle is a short fulldome piece which uses timelapse photography to reveal the majesty of Earth’s natural environments. It’s a subtle meditation on how a small shift in our perception of time can heighten our awareness of the intricate ecosystem surrounding us. The cycle emerges.

Prior to teaching the MassArt 2015 course, Eric wanted to get more in-depth experience with fulldome production. So he spent the summer camping and shot a bunch of beautiful timelapse photography with a fisheye lens. Then he selected the best timelapse shots, did some tests in the dome, composed the music in 5.1 surround, and edited together this stunning piece for the dome.

Eric Freeman is an electronic music producer, multi-instrumentalist, photographer and video artist. In his music production, Eric weaves together elements of world, electronic, and experimental sounds to create a sonic landscape accompanied by visuals. His recent video work is a combination of light painting photography and time lapse.

Shot with a Canon 6D, Canon 8-15mm lens, and a Kessler parallax motorized rail system.


Domemasters Freely Available

  • Available for planetarium use. Contact me and I’ll give you an address to ship an external hard drive. Please include a SASE or IRC.
  • 4k domemaster frames, 30fps, 5.1 & stereo audio, (195GB).
  • 2k Quicktime MOV available for download by request (2.0GB).
  • 1k Quicktime MOV available for download by request (2.6GB).

Terms: permission to freely screen to the public in planetariums as you see fit. You must screen the short in full and unedited. Not to be used in other shows without permission.


Screenings

International Planetariums
— ESO Supernova planetarium (Garching, Germany)
— GEMS American Academy, Planetarium (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates)
— Hvězdárna a Planetárium Brno (Brno, Czech Republic)
— Stuttgart Planetarium (Stuttgart, Germany)
— Digital Mobile Planetarium Wenu Mapu (Rio Negro, Argentina)
— Anápolis Planetarium (Anápolis, Brazil)
— ARK Dome (Geneva, Switzerland)
— Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Planetarium (Mashhad, Iran)
— Baikonur Planetarium (Poland)
— StratoSphere Domes (Eastbourne, England)
— Roi-Et Planetarium, Science and Cultural Center for Education (Phitsanulok, Thailand)
— Portable Planetarium (Novosibirsk, Russia)
— Portable Planetarium (Zhoushan, China)
— Metaspace Planetarium (Seoul, Korea)
— Scitech Planetarium, Scitech Discovery Centre (West Perth, Australia)
— Planetarium and Observatory of Cà del Monte (Cecima, Italy)
— Herne Observatory (Herne, Germany)
— Esfera Espacial Planetarium (Chiapas, Mexico)
— NEST Dome (Québec, Canada)
— Yeongyang Firefly Astronomical Observatory (Yeongyang, South Korea)
— Agora Science Center (Debrecen, Hungary)
— Gyeongsangnamdo Institute of Science Education (Gyeongnam, South Korea)
— Adelaide Planetarium (Adelaide, Australia)

USA Planetariums
— Museum of Science, Charles Hayden Planetarium (Boston, MA)
— Adler Planetarium (Chicago, IL)
— IAIA: Institute of American Indian Arts, Digital Dome (Santa Fe, NM)
— Science Museum of Virginia, Planetarium (Richmond, VA)
— Glastonbury Planetarium (Glastonbury, CT)
— West Virginia University Planetarium (Morgantown, WV)
— Northside ISD Planetarium (San Antonio, TX)
— Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, Planetarium (Fort Collins, CO)
— Sudekum Planetarium, Adventure Science Center (Nashville, TN)
— SMSU Planetarium (Marshall, MN)
— Neag Planetarium, Reading Public Museum (Reading, PA)
— East Village Planetarium, The Girls Club (New York, NY)
— University of Texas at Arlington Planetarium (Arlington, TX)
— Chapel of Sacred Mirrors [CoSM], Dome (Wappingers Falls, New York)
— Anchorage Museum Planetarium (Anchorage, AK)
— Gary E. Sampson Planetarium (Wauwatosa, WI)
— COSI Planetarium (Columbus, OH)
— Tombaugh Planetarium, New Mexico Museum of Space History (Alamogordo, NM)
— Acheson Planetarium, Cranbrook Institute of Science (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

Cycle_EricFreeman_Poster

The Unknown Between – MassArt 2015: Fulldome Show

During the 2015 Spring semester at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, students explored the topic of hypnagogia. In less than 5 months these students collaborated on all aspects of storytelling, concept development, surround sound design, and 4k fulldome production to create an immersive experience which explores the moment between wakefulness and sleep.

Its amazing that the students were able to complete a 4k show with 5.1 surround sound… within one semester!
MassArt_SIM
Due to the success of the previous MassArt 2013 show, we decided to work again with MassArt to bring art students into the planetarium. This semester the course was taught by Eric Freeman with Nita Sturiale in an advisory role. Special thanks to Cole Wuilleumier as the TA. Together they did an incredible job of enabling the students to feel creative and comfortable within the often confusing fulldome technical requirements.

Students: Corinne Perreault, Katherine McGrath, Caleb Chase, Michael Degregorio, Michael Dunne, Emily Shapiro, John Steiner, Shannon Whalen, Molly Rennie, Sara Neary, Dan Callahan, Gabriel Golbfarb
Professor: Eric Freeman
Teaching Assistant: Cole Wuilleumier
Advisor: Nita Sturiale
Special Thanks: Jason Fletcher, Toshi Hoo


Domemasters Freely Available

  • Available for planetarium use. Contact me and I’ll give you an address to ship an external hard drive. Please include a SASE or IRC.
  • 4k domemaster frames, 30fps, 5.1 & stereo audio, (183GB).
  • 2k Quicktime MOV available for download by request (6.3GB).
  • 1k Quicktime MOV available for download by request (3.0GB).

Terms: permission to freely screen to the public in planetariums as you see fit. You must screen the short in full and unedited. Not to be used in other shows without permission.


Screenings

International Planetariums
— ESO Supernova planetarium (Garching, Germany)
— GEMS American Academy, Planetarium (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates)
— Stuttgart Planetarium (Stuttgart, Germany)
— Digital Mobile Planetarium Wenu Mapu (Rio Negro, Argentina)
— ARK Dome (Geneva, Switzerland)
— Baikonur Planetarium (Poland)
— StratoSphere Domes (Eastbourne, England)
— Portable Planetarium (Novosibirsk, Russia)
— Scitech Planetarium, Scitech Discovery Centre (West Perth, Australia)
— Herne Observatory (Herne, Germany)

USA Planetariums
— Museum of Science, Charles Hayden Planetarium (Boston, MA)
— IAIA: Institute of American Indian Arts, Digital Dome (Santa Fe, NM)
— Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, Planetarium (Fort Collins, CO)
— Northside ISD Planetarium (San Antonio, TX)
— Science Museum of Virginia, Planetarium (Richmond, VA)
— John Carl Pogue Planetarium, Grand Prairie ISD (Grand Prairie, TX)
— SMSU Planetarium (Marshall, MN)
— Neag Planetarium, Reading Public Museum (Reading, PA)
— University of Texas at Arlington Planetarium (Arlington, TX)
— Chapel of Sacred Mirrors [CoSM], Dome (Wappingers Falls, New York)
— COSI Planetarium (Columbus, OH)
— Acheson Planetarium, Cranbrook Institute of Science (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

MassArt_UnknownBetween_Poster

Sentient – MassArt 2013: Fulldome Show

During the 2013 Spring semester at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, students explored the topic of consciousness. In less than 5 months these students collaborated on all aspects of storytelling, concept development, sound design, and fulldome production to create an immersive experience which explores the creative, perceptive, and unexplored mind.

What they were able to accomplish in such a short time is pretty astonishing and I’m excited to share their work with you.
MassArt_SIM
This project happened because MassArt Studio for Interrelated Media Professor Nita Sturiale approached us with the idea of having her students create work in the Planetarium. Special thanks also goes out to Lina Maria Giraldo, Karina Tovar, and Eric Freeman. Check out their behind the scenes blog to learn more.

Students: Nicole Barron, Jesslyn Boisclair, Jenna Calderara, Kerri Coburn, Megan Dauphinais, Lila Debas, Nicole Dube, Chip Dunn, Stephen Kelly, Esther Moon, Sam Okerstrom-Lang, Danielle Thibeault, Kelsey Trottier, Cole Wuilleumier, Alexandra Zanca
Professor: Nita Sturiale
Project Manager: Lina Maria Giraldo
Teaching Assistant: Karina Tovar
Special Thanks: Jason Fletcher, Eric Freeman, Max Azanow, R. Berred Ouellette
Sound Source Material: Adam Blake, Jacob Bohlan, Tom Fahey, Brendan Smith


1k Quicktime Freely Available

  • Available for planetarium use. Please contact me if interested.
  • 1k Quicktime MOV available for download by request (3.4GB).

Terms: permission to freely screen to the public in planetariums as you see fit. You must screen the short in full and unedited. Not to be used in other shows without permission.


Screenings

Conferences & Festivals
— 2014 Melbourne International Film Festival, Melbourne Planetarium (Melbourne, Australia)

International Planetariums
— ESO Supernova planetarium (Garching, Germany)
— GEMS American Academy, Planetarium (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates)
— Hvězdárna a Planetárium Brno (Brno, Czech Republic)
— Stuttgart Planetarium (Stuttgart, Germany)
— Digital Mobile Planetarium Wenu Mapu (Rio Negro, Argentina)
— ARK Dome (Geneva, Switzerland)
— Baikonur Planetarium (Poland)
— Gotoinc Planetarium (Calcutta, India)
— StratoSphere Domes (Eastbourne, England)
— Portable Planetarium (Novosibirsk, Russia)
— Portable Planetarium (Zhoushan, China)
— Scitech Planetarium, Scitech Discovery Centre (West Perth, Australia)
— Herne Observatory (Herne, Germany)

USA Planetariums
— Museum of Science, Charles Hayden Planetarium (Boston, MA)
— IAIA: Institute of American Indian Arts, Digital Dome (Santa Fe, NM)
— Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, Planetarium (Fort Collins, CO)
— Sudekum Planetarium, Adventure Science Center (Nashville, TN)
— Taylor Planetarium, Museum of the Rockies (Bozeman, MT)
— Arvin Gottlieb Planetarium, Science City (Kansas City, MO)
— Northside ISD Planetarium (San Antonio, TX)
— Science Museum of Virginia, Planetarium (Richmond, VA)
— SMSU Planetarium (Marshall, MN)
— Neag Planetarium, Reading Public Museum (Reading, PA)
— University of Texas at Arlington Planetarium (Arlington, TX)
— Chapel of Sacred Mirrors [CoSM], Dome (Wappingers Falls, New York)
— COSI Planetarium (Columbus, OH)
— Acheson Planetarium, Cranbrook Institute of Science (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

MassArt_Sentient_Poster