The Reefs of Belize – Fulldome & VR Short

In January 2016, Allan Adams and Keith Ellenbogen took a group of MIT students scuba diving in Belize as part of a college course on underwater conservation photography. Coral reefs worldwide are deteriorating due to changes in our climate and so it’s important to document both the beauty of our oceans and what’s happening to them. Capturing this moment in time is important for future generations to learn from, be immersed in, and be inspired from.

Keith Ellenbogen is an acclaimed underwater photographer and videographer who focuses on environmental conservation. Ellenbogen documents marine life to showcase its beauty and to elicit an emotional connection to the underwater world. He aims to inspire social change and action toward protecting the marine environment.

Over the past few years, Ellenbogen has collaborated with MIT theoretical physicist Allan Adams who is focuses on the intersection of art, science, and cutting-edge technology. During his residency, they worked with Edgerton Center Associate Director Jim Bales to explore new high-speed photography and other underwater imaging techniques. They also developed an ‘Underwater Conservation Photography’ course taught at MIT and challenged students to push technical and aesthetic boundaries in the pursuit of compelling images of marine conservation.


Domemasters Freely Available

  • The Reefs of Belize, Still Shot 1, and Still Shot 2 are available for planetarium use. Please contact me to obtain a download link.
  • 4k domemaster frames, 30fps, stereo audio
  • 2k MOV or MP4
  • 1k MOV or MP4

Terms: permission to freely screen to the public in planetariums as you see fit. You must screen the short in full and unedited. Not to be used in other shows without permission.


Behind the Scenes

Allan and Keith approached the Museum of Science’s planetarium team because of its expertise in 360° video. It was a perfect meeting of minds and collaboration started immediately to fully test the equipment and plan for the dive. 360° video is very challenging to begin with and it’s even more difficult underwater, so I’ve documented some of the important things we learned.

From the very beginning we were aiming to use the immersive scuba footage for a live lecture in the planetarium. It was only after throwing this event that we realized other planetariums and the VR community might be interested. We should note that this was our first underwater project and we have learned a ton along the way. So some of the shots are a little shaky, lighting isn’t ideal, footage contrasty, and no underwater audio was recorded. Shooting underwater is difficult and you simply cannot improvise with shot techniques in the same way as a 360° shoot on land. But that’s hindsight and so we decided to share the best shots edited into a short film, even if it doesn’t reach the high bar we’ve set for ourselves. Because what’s the use of it keeping it private? We are proud of this project and hope it can inspire others to remember the hidden beauty of the ocean.

360Abyss-RigBut you might be wondering, how do you capture underwater 360° video? It’s possible through the use of 6 GoPro cameras and the specially designed 360Rize 360Abyss scuba rig. Since it’s going underwater, it needs to be watertight and also use domes for the camera porthole due to water refraction.

Prior to the expedition, we needed to test the 360° camera rig underwater and preferably not just in an old bucket. Luckily Keith is good friends with the New England Aquarium and so our first tests were within the Giant Ocean Tank, a gigantic cylindrical aquarium in the center of the aquarium. We were instantly excited about the results. During this time students were practicing shooting still photography within an olympic-size pool.

There are so many worrying factors when pairing scuba diving with photography. You need to keep track of oxygen levels, focus and expose your camera, be careful of sea life, keep the group together, track the boat, and the list goes on. So being prepared mentally, physically, and technically is important.


Glover’s Reef Research Station

Their expedition took them to the Glover’s Reef Research Station in Belize, which is operated by the Wildlife Conservation Society. They worked with the research station staff to carefully dive in the conserved coral reefs and shoot underwater photography. The WCS mission is to save wildlife and wild places worldwide through science, conservation action, education, and inspiring people to value nature. They envision a world where wildlife thrives in healthy lands and seas, valued by societies that embrace and benefit from the diversity and integrity of life on earth.

Glover’s Reef is a partially submerged atoll located off the southern coast of Belize, approximately 45km from the mainland. It forms part of the outermost boundary of the Belize Barrier Reef. It harbors one of the greatest diversity of reef types in the western Caribbean. A large spawning site for the endangered Nassau grouper is located at the northeastern end of the atoll. It has been identified as one of only two viable sites remaining for the species, of nine originally known locations. In 2002, it was declared a special marine reserve, permanently closed to fishing.


Credits

A co-production by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Charles Hayden Planetarium, Museum of Science, Boston

Underwater 360º Photography:
Keith Ellenbogen – MIT CAST Visiting Artist / Assistant Professor Photography SUNY/FIT
Allan Adams, Associate Professor – MIT Dept of Physics

Post-Production:
Stitched and edited by Jason Fletcher
Charles Hayden Planetarium, Museum of Science

Special Thanks:
The MIT Edgerton Center and Jim Bales
The Roy Little Fund at MIT
The MIT Alumni Class Fund
Wildlife Conservation Society, Glover’s Reef Research Station, Belize


Screenings

Conferences & Festivals
— Further Fest 2017 (Nashville, TN)

International Planetariums
— ESO Supernova Planetarium (Garching, Germany)
— Portable Planetarium (Karnataka, India)
— Portable Planetarium (Huelva, Spain)
— Melbourne Planetarium, Scienceworks (Melbourne, Australia)
— CCAF Observatory & Planetarium (Farra d’Isonzo, Italy)

USA Planetariums
— Museum of Science, Charles Hayden Planetarium (Boston, MA)
— Slippery Rock University Planetarium (Slippery Rock, PA)
— Ho Tung Visualization Laboratory & Planetarium (Hamilton, NY)
— Collier County Public Schools, Portable Planetarium (Naples, FL)

Distributors
— ESO Fulldome Archive
— Dome Club (UK)
— British Fulldome Institute
— Kosmos Scientific de México

Blueprint to Blastoff: Free Engineering Materials for the Planetarium or Classroom

Talia-Bio-PhotoWe are offering 3 distinct educational modules, focusing on aspects of spacecraft engineering, to anyone with a planetarium or classroom who would like to use them. They supplement, but are independent of our newest show From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA and are being shared free of charge.

This article was written by Talia Sepersky. She currently works as a planetarium educator at the Charles Hayden Planetarium, Museum of Science, Boston.

SECTIONS
Intro: Putting the “E” back in “STEM”
Module 1: Fixing the Hubble Space Telescope
Module 2: Gravity And Space Travel
Module 3: Design a Mission
The Guides
4k Downloads
Teacher Bundles


Intro: Putting the “E” back in “STEM”

When it comes to STEM, planetarium shows tend to be very good at covering the science, technology, and even the math portions, but engineering often gets left out. To help fill this void, in 2013 we, the staff of the Charles Hayden Planetarium at the Museum of Science, Boston, teamed up with NASA to make a planetarium show about spacecraft engineering. The result of this partnership is the show “From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA,” which explores what it takes to design, test, build, and fly a successful space mission.

As much as we would have liked to, we could not talk in detail about every part of spacecraft engineering during the show. However, through the partnership with NASA, we were able to expand on a few engineering topics from the show in three separate, supplementary education modules. We are extremely pleased to be able to offer these modules to anyone who wants to use them completely free of charge.

The modules themselves have three very different lengths, styles, and topics, and are designed to be presented in different ways. They can be used on a planetarium dome, and a flatscreen version permits their use on a conventional screen as well. Although each goes into depth on topics that are raised in “From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA,” they all stand on their own and require no knowledge of the show itself. The three modules are: “Fixing the Hubble Space Telescope”, “Gravity and Space Travel”, and “Design a Mission”.


Module 1: Fixing the Hubble Space Telescope

We’ve found that many people in our audiences know that there was something wrong with Hubble when it launched, and that it was eventually fixed. However, few people tend to be aware of the details. The first of our modules, “Fixing the Hubble Space Telescope,” goes into some of those details. It’s the most straightforward of the three modules, consisting of a single video approximately eight minutes long. Large portions of the narration are undertaken by Dr. Jeffrey Hoffman, a former astronaut who flew on the first Hubble servicing mission.

With this module we wanted to focus on a specific case of spacecraft engineering, and Hubble Servicing Mission 1 provides a fantastic real life example. We also wanted to bring in the idea that failures can be instructive.

This module starts by introducing Hubble in space, and then describing how astronomers realized the telescope had a flaw, using some of Hubble’s earliest observations to make the point. It then takes Hubble apart to show the primary mirror and allow Dr. Hoffman to describe exactly what went wrong with making it.

While still looking at a cutaway view of Hubble, Dr. Hoffman goes on to explain the “fix” designed by engineers to repair Hubble, describing the arrangement of mirrors that allowed light entering Hubble’s tube to be refocused before landing on the detection instruments. While he is providing the narration, the visuals show this in action, following a light path all the way through Hubble to the instruments.

The module then moves on to the installation of the new optics on Hubble, with Dr. Hoffman talking about the work on the shuttle mission. This is accompanied by visuals of Hubble and the space shuttle in space, as well as actual video clips from the mission. In one of our favorite parts of this module, Dr. Hoffman shares his story of receiving the phone call that let him know the fix had worked, as well as some thoughts on what it felt like to actually touch Hubble. Some of the visuals for this portion include Hubble images, comparing pictures of the same objects before and after the repair.

The module concludes with the idea that we can learn from failures like Hubble’s. To quote Dr. Hoffman at the module’s end, “The important thing, though, is if you do have a failure, you really need to be able to learn from it. To have a failure that you don’t learn anything from, that’s tragic.”


Module 2: Gravity And Space Travel

It turns out that describing what goes on during a gravity assist can be tricky business. This module introduces some of the mechanics of the momentum transfer that happens during a gravity assist maneuver through Earth-based and space-based examples, as well as describing some of the various ways gravity assists can be used in a space mission.

Since gravity assists can be a tough subject to teach and the depth a presenter goes into will vary widely with different audiences, we designed this module to be as flexible as possible. It is broken up into five segments, each about 1-2 minutes in length (for a total of about 7 minutes of video). Each segment can be presented independently of the others if the presenter only wants to use some but not all. They can also follow after each other, with each segment building on the one before.

We created this format with the idea of using live interpretations in between each of the segments, to reiterate or emphasize the content covered in the previous segment and set up for the next one. However—maximum flexibility!—they can also be strung together to create one unbroken video, depending on the presenter’s preferred style. The core ideas behind momentum transfer and gravity assists are presented in segments 2 and 3, so our recommendation is that at least these two be used.

Segment 1 is relatively straightforward. It starts with the idea that spacecraft travel is often not as easy as pointing the spacecraft at its destination and giving it a push. It introduces the terms “gravity assist” and “momentum transfer” and also defines the word “momentum.”

Segment 2’s purpose is to help the audience gain a better understand of the transfer of momentum using an Earth-based example. To this end, we enlisted the help of a local roller derby team. We wanted to emphasize the idea that gravity assists work not just because the planets are large (i.e. have a lot of gravity) but because they are also moving (i.e. have a lot of momentum).

For this, we had one skater (designated Skater One) hold still and whip her teammates around her as they approach. While her teammates’ paths change, their speed remains more or less the same. We then recreated the same scenario with Skater One also in motion. This time, when she whips her teammates around, their speed increases noticeably even as Skater One’s decreases, due to the momentum transfer between them.

Segment 3 builds on the Earth-based example with a space-based one, specifically the New Horizons gravity assist flyby of Jupiter in February 2007. It starts by looking at what would have happened if New Horizons had gone directly from Earth to Pluto, then looks at the Jupiter flyby. The visuals show an overhead view of New Horizons approaching Jupiter and then visibly increasing its speed as it flies past. This segment uses some actual numbers to get across how much momentum Jupiter has to spare and to emphasize the fact that the planet is, for all practical purposes, not actually affected by losing some. It ends by describing the changes in New Horizons’ speed and flight time as a result of the flyby.

Since Segment 3 presents how a gravity assist can be used to speed a spacecraft up, Segment 4 explores how one can be used to slow a spacecraft down. It shows how the angle at which a spacecraft approaches a planet determines whether the planet transfers momentum to the spacecraft (to speed the spacecraft up) or the spacecraft transfers momentum to the planet (to slow the spacecraft down). It also re-emphasizes the idea that, no matter what the spacecraft does, it will have no practical effect on the planet.

The final segment, Segment 5, brings up the use of multiple gravity assists in a single mission, requiring careful planning many years in advance. To conclude, it loops back to the idea raised in Segment 1 that many space missions are only possible with the use of gravity assists (showing some of the rather convoluted paths these missions took), and that by making clever use of them we have vastly expanded our knowledge of the Solar System.


Module 3: Design a Mission

The “Design a Mission” module is the most interactive of the three and requires a live presentation. In this activity the audience, using information provided to them by the presenter, designs a spacecraft to search for signs of water in the Solar System. They have to choose a destination and then, based on that destination, a power source and whether their spacecraft will be a lander or orbiter. If they design their spacecraft well to suit their destination, the mission will succeed. If they do not, the mission will fail (and how it fails depends on the spacecraft design).

The module itself is made up of thirteen video clips to incorporate all the possible outcomes of the audience’s decisions. In total, the video clips make up about 35 minutes of footage, but a presenter should only need a fraction of that during any given presentation.

The first clip represents the audience’s first decision: will their spacecraft travel to Mars or Saturn in search of evidence of water? The visual for this clip is fairly basic, with images of both of those planets on the screen.

Once they’ve chosen the destination, the second clip represents the audience’s next decision: will the spacecraft be an orbiter or a lander? The presenter may want to provide the audience with some of the benefits and disadvantages of each, or ask the audience to come up with some on their own. The visual is of the two different styles of spacecraft. The “lander” option is based roughly on Cassini with a Huygens-style lander attached to its side.

The third decision is whether to make the spacecraft solar or nuclear-powered, and there are two clips that can potentially be used depending on whether the audience chose an orbiter or a lander. If they chose “lander,” the corresponding clip shows two versions of the lander-style spacecraft, one with solar panels and one without (the nuclear reactor is visible on the bottom edge of the nuclear-powered spacecraft, but is small and not immediately obvious like the solar panels). If they chose “orbiter” the visual is the same, with the orbiter-style spacecraft instead. Again, the presenter may want to make sure the audience knows the benefits and drawbacks of each choice.


Now that they have designed their spacecraft, it’s time to send it to the chosen planet and see if it succeeds. There are eight different clips to represent the eight possible outcomes of the audience’s choices. All start with a liftoff from Earth and a view of the spacecraft moving towards its destination. What happens once it starts moving depends on how well the spacecraft was designed.

The four Mars scenarios (nuclear orbiter, nuclear lander, solar orbiter, and solar lander) all succeed. The two lander scenarios make use of the landing sequence of the Curiosity rover for visuals. The landers will find evidence for water in the form of “blueberries,” frost, and silica deposits. The orbiters will find evidence of water from seeing river channels, hydrogen deposits, and rampart craters.




It’s much harder to succeed at Saturn, and only one scenario, the nuclear-powered orbiter, will lead to success. If the audience chose a solar-powered spacecraft, then as it moves through space towards Saturn the picture will turn to static to represent the spacecraft losing power and shutting down. If they chose a nuclear-powered lander, they will see a rather stunning sequence of their lander entering the atmosphere, heating up, and exploding. If they chose a nuclear-powered orbiter, they will find evidence of water in the geysers on Enceladus and in Saturn’s E Ring.




Since not all of the mission designs succeed, the presenter may wish to talk about failure in spacecraft engineering. To this end, we wanted to show audiences that the professionals also sometimes don’t get it right. The final clip shows images from four real life failed missions from different countries, specifically the Vanguard rocket, the Mars Climate Orbiter, the Phobos-Grunt mission, and the Akatsuki mission. As with the end of the “Fixing Hubble” module, the idea is to emphasize that failures happen, and that the important thing is to learn from them when they do.


The Guides

Between them, these three modules present a lot of information, some of it very specific. To make them as easy as possible for a large variety of institutions to use, we’ve also created planetarian guides to go with each. Our hope is that a presenter with no background in any of these three topics can make an effective presentation on any or all of them using just the material found in the corresponding planetarian guide. In addition to the script for the module, a set of FAQs, and a glossary, each guide contains copious background information as well as some suggestions for presentation.

The “Fixing Hubble” guide includes a layout of Hubble’s optics, even more detail about the flaw and how it was fixed, a brief breakdown of each of NASA’s Hubble servicing missions, and a list of Hubble specifications.

The “Gravity and Space Travel” guide goes into greater detail about the mechanics of gravity assists, how momentum is transferred, and why the spacecraft’s trajectory changes. It also looks at the usefulness of gravity assists on specific missions and provides a list of missions that have made notable uses of gravity assists. In the script section, it provides some guidelines for live interpretation in between the video segments as well instructions on how to recreate the roller skater demo from Segment 2 in house, using either staff or audience members.

The “Design a Mission” guide includes specific descriptions of each of the visuals in the clips and what they are designed to represent. There is an outline for the progression of the module, with some guidelines for discussion, background information on the pros and cons of landers, orbiters, solar power, and nuclear power, and a description of why each mission succeeds or fails. There is also a list of all of the video clips included with this module.

Separate from the planetarian guides, there is a set of educator guides for teachers using the modules in a standard classroom setting. The educator guides are geared more towards using the modules as part of a lesson in a school environment rather than a presentation in a planetarium show, and the information they include is not as detailed as that in the planetarian guides. There are also educator guides for topics not included in the modules, including “Waves and Information Transfer” and “Infrared Astronomy,” which also expand a bit on topics raised in the show “From Dream to Discovery.”


4k Downloads

To ensure that many different institutions, classrooms, and other settings can make use of our modules, we are offering them in a variety of formats. The modules are all available in 1K, 2K, and 4K fulldome versions for planetarium domes. There are also flat versions available for use in standard classrooms or for anyone using a flatscreen projector (complete with captions).

4k domemaster downloads are available on the ESO Fulldome Archive.


Teacher Bundles

The Teacher Bundles for “Fixing Hubble” and “Gravity Assist” include the flatscreen captioned versions of the modules as well as the educator guides. The classroom version of “Design a Mission” is web-based, so the Teacher Bundle for that module includes the educator guide and link to the web-based activity. The modules page also includes a Teacher Bundle with the “Waves and Information Transfer” and “Infrared Astronomy” educator guides.


Copyright 2015 International Planetarium Society; article used with permission.

This material is based upon work supported by NASA under grant number NNX12AL19G. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed are those of the Museum of Science, Boston and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

Cycle – Fulldome Short

Cycle is a short fulldome piece which uses timelapse photography to reveal the majesty of Earth’s natural environments. It’s a subtle meditation on how a small shift in our perception of time can heighten our awareness of the intricate ecosystem surrounding us. The cycle emerges.

Prior to teaching the MassArt 2015 course, Eric wanted to get more in-depth experience with fulldome production. So he spent the summer camping and shot a bunch of beautiful timelapse photography with a fisheye lens. Then he selected the best timelapse shots, did some tests in the dome, composed the music in 5.1 surround, and edited together this stunning piece for the dome.

Eric Freeman is an electronic music producer, multi-instrumentalist, photographer and video artist. In his music production, Eric weaves together elements of world, electronic, and experimental sounds to create a sonic landscape accompanied by visuals. His recent video work is a combination of light painting photography and time lapse.

Shot with a Canon 6D, Canon 8-15mm lens, and a Kessler parallax motorized rail system.


Domemasters Freely Available

  • Available for planetarium use. Please contact me to obtain a download link.
  • 4k domemaster frames, 30fps, 5.1 surround & stereo audio
  • 2k MOV or MP4
  • 1k MOV or MP4

Terms: permission to freely screen to the public in planetariums as you see fit. You must screen the short in full and unedited. Not to be used in other shows without permission.


Screenings

Conferences & Festivals
— Melbourne International Film Festival 2016 (Melbourne, Australia)
— Currents New Media Festival 2015, IAIA Dome (Santa Fe, NM)
— Further Fest 2017 (Nashville, TN)

International Planetariums
— ESO Supernova planetarium (Garching, Germany)
— GEMS American Academy, Planetarium (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates)
— Hvězdárna a Planetárium Brno (Brno, Czech Republic)
— Stuttgart Planetarium (Stuttgart, Germany)
— Digital Mobile Planetarium Wenu Mapu (Rio Negro, Argentina)
— Anápolis Planetarium (Anápolis, Brazil)
— ARK Dome (Geneva, Switzerland)
— Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Planetarium (Mashhad, Iran)
— Baikonur Planetarium (Poland)
— StratoSphere Domes (Eastbourne, England)
— Roi-Et Planetarium, Science and Cultural Center for Education (Phitsanulok, Thailand)
— Portable Planetarium (Novosibirsk, Russia)
— Portable Planetarium (Zhoushan, China)
— Metaspace Planetarium (Seoul, Korea)
— Scitech Planetarium, Scitech Discovery Centre (West Perth, Australia)
— Planetarium and Observatory of Cà del Monte (Cecima, Italy)
— Herne Observatory (Herne, Germany)
— Esfera Espacial Planetarium (Chiapas, Mexico)
— NEST Dome (Québec, Canada)
— Yeongyang Firefly Astronomical Observatory (Yeongyang, South Korea)
— Agora Science Center (Debrecen, Hungary)
— Gyeongsangnamdo Institute of Science Education (Gyeongnam, South Korea)
— Adelaide Planetarium (Adelaide, Australia)
— Adventure Domes (Saint Petersburg, Russia)
— Interactive Science Museum, Newton Park (Krasnoyarsk, Russia)
— Portable Planetarium (Czech Republic)
— Gwacheon National Science Museum (Gwacheon, South Korea)
— Kiev Planetarium (Kiev, Ukraine)
— Ulsan Science Museum (Ulsan, South Korea)
— Zhejiang Science and Technology Museum, Planetarium (Hangzhou, China)
— National Youth Science Center (Dongil-myeon, South Korea)
— Association Andromede, Observatoire de Marseille (Marseille)
— Fundación ProyectaRSE, portable Dome (Bogotá, Colombia)
— Skyward Planetarium (Tamil Nadu, India)
— Çağ University, Space Observation & Research Center (Mersin, Turkey)
— Planet Crete (Crete, Greece)
— Novosibirsk Planetarium (Novosibirsk, Russia)
— Portable Planetarium (Athens, Greece)
— Planetario Malargüe (Mendoza, Argentina)
— JC Cinesferic (Madrid, Spain)
— Portable Planetarium (Huelva, Spain)

USA Planetariums
— Museum of Science, Charles Hayden Planetarium (Boston, MA)
— Adler Planetarium (Chicago, IL)
— IAIA: Institute of American Indian Arts, Digital Dome (Santa Fe, NM)
— Science Museum of Virginia, Planetarium (Richmond, VA)
— Glastonbury Planetarium (Glastonbury, CT)
— West Virginia University Planetarium (Morgantown, WV)
— Northside ISD Planetarium (San Antonio, TX)
— Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, Planetarium (Fort Collins, CO)
— Sudekum Planetarium, Adventure Science Center (Nashville, TN)
— SMSU Planetarium (Marshall, MN)
— Neag Planetarium, Reading Public Museum (Reading, PA)
— East Village Planetarium, The Girls Club (New York, NY)
— University of Texas at Arlington Planetarium (Arlington, TX)
— Chapel of Sacred Mirrors [CoSM], Dome (Wappingers Falls, New York)
— Anchorage Museum Planetarium (Anchorage, AK)
— Gary E. Sampson Planetarium (Wauwatosa, WI)
— COSI Planetarium (Columbus, OH)
— Tombaugh Planetarium, New Mexico Museum of Space History (Alamogordo, NM)
— Acheson Planetarium, Cranbrook Institute of Science (Bloomfield Hills, MI)
— Illinois State University Planetarium (Normal, IL)
— SciTech Museum, Planetarium (Aurora, IL)
— Hatter Planetarium, Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA)
— Framingham State University Planetarium (Framingham, MA)
— Portable Planetarium (Centennial, CO)
— Collier County Public Schools, Portable Planetarium (Naples, FL)
— Dreyfuss Planetarium, Newark Museum (Newark, NJ)

Distributors
— ESO Fulldome Archive
— E&S Digistar Cloud Library
— Spitz: Scidome Network
— Dome Club (UK)
— British Fulldome Institute
— Metaspace
— Adventure Domes
— Kosmos Scientific de México

Cycle_EricFreeman_Poster

The Unknown Between – MassArt 2015: Fulldome Show

During the 2015 Spring semester at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, students explored the topic of hypnagogia. In less than 5 months these students collaborated on all aspects of storytelling, concept development, surround sound design, and 4k fulldome production to create an immersive experience which explores the moment between wakefulness and sleep.

It’s amazing that the students were able to complete a 4k show with 5.1 surround sound… within one semester!
MassArt_SIM
Due to the success of the previous MassArt 2013 show, we decided to work again with MassArt to bring art students into the planetarium. This semester the course was taught by Eric Freeman with Nita Sturiale in an advisory role. Special thanks to Cole Wuilleumier as the TA. Together they did an incredible job of enabling the students to feel creative and comfortable within the often confusing fulldome technical requirements.

Students: Corinne Perreault, Katherine McGrath, Caleb Chase, Michael Degregorio, Michael Dunne, Emily Shapiro, John Steiner, Shannon Whalen, Molly Rennie, Sara Neary, Dan Callahan, Gabriel Golbfarb
Professor: Eric Freeman
Teaching Assistant: Cole Wuilleumier
Advisor: Nita Sturiale
Special Thanks: Jason Fletcher, Toshi Hoo


Domemasters Freely Available

  • Available for planetarium use. Please contact me to obtain a download link.
  • 4k domemaster frames, 30fps, 5.1 surround & stereo audio
  • 2k MOV or MP4
  • 1k MOV or MP4

Terms: permission to freely screen to the public in planetariums as you see fit. You must screen the short in full and unedited. Not to be used in other shows without permission.


Screenings

Conferences & Festivals
— Melbourne International Film Festival 2016 (Melbourne, Australia)
— Further Fest 2017 (Nashville, TN)

International Planetariums
— ESO Supernova planetarium (Garching, Germany)
— GEMS American Academy, Planetarium (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates)
— Stuttgart Planetarium (Stuttgart, Germany)
— Digital Mobile Planetarium Wenu Mapu (Rio Negro, Argentina)
— ARK Dome (Geneva, Switzerland)
— Baikonur Planetarium (Poland)
— StratoSphere Domes (Eastbourne, England)
— Portable Planetarium (Novosibirsk, Russia)
— Scitech Planetarium, Scitech Discovery Centre (West Perth, Australia)
— Herne Observatory (Herne, Germany)
— Nemesis Planetarium (Civitanova Marche, Italy)
— Zhejiang Science and Technology Museum, Planetarium (Hangzhou, China)
— Çağ University, Space Observation & Research Center (Mersin, Turkey)
— Planet Crete (Crete, Greece)
— Portable Planetarium (Athens, Greece)
— JC Cinesferic (Madrid, Spain)
— Portable Planetarium (Huelva, Spain)

USA Planetariums
— Museum of Science, Charles Hayden Planetarium (Boston, MA)
— IAIA: Institute of American Indian Arts, Digital Dome (Santa Fe, NM)
— Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, Planetarium (Fort Collins, CO)
— Northside ISD Planetarium (San Antonio, TX)
— Science Museum of Virginia, Planetarium (Richmond, VA)
— John Carl Pogue Planetarium, Grand Prairie ISD (Grand Prairie, TX)
— SMSU Planetarium (Marshall, MN)
— Neag Planetarium, Reading Public Museum (Reading, PA)
— University of Texas at Arlington Planetarium (Arlington, TX)
— Chapel of Sacred Mirrors [CoSM], Dome (Wappingers Falls, New York)
— COSI Planetarium (Columbus, OH)
— Acheson Planetarium, Cranbrook Institute of Science (Bloomfield Hills, MI)
— Moorhead Planetarium, Minnesota State University (Mankato, MN)
— SciTech Museum, Planetarium (Aurora, IL)
— Framingham State University Planetarium (Framingham, MA)
— Collier County Public Schools, Portable Planetarium (Naples, FL)

Distributors
— ESO Fulldome Archive
— Spitz: Scidome Network
— Dome Club (UK)
— British Fulldome Institute
— Kosmos Scientific de México

MassArt_UnknownBetween_Poster

Sentient – MassArt 2013: Fulldome Show

During the 2013 Spring semester at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, students explored the topic of consciousness. In less than 5 months these students collaborated on all aspects of storytelling, concept development, sound design, and fulldome production to create an immersive experience which explores the creative, perceptive, and unexplored mind.

What they were able to accomplish in such a short time is pretty astonishing and I’m excited to share their work with you.
MassArt_SIM
This project happened because MassArt Studio for Interrelated Media Professor Nita Sturiale approached us with the idea of having her students create work in the Planetarium. Special thanks also goes out to Lina Maria Giraldo, Karina Tovar, and Eric Freeman. Check out their behind the scenes blog to learn more.

Students: Nicole Barron, Jesslyn Boisclair, Jenna Calderara, Kerri Coburn, Megan Dauphinais, Lila Debas, Nicole Dube, Chip Dunn, Stephen Kelly, Esther Moon, Sam Okerstrom-Lang, Danielle Thibeault, Kelsey Trottier, Cole Wuilleumier, Alexandra Zanca
Professor: Nita Sturiale
Project Manager: Lina Maria Giraldo
Teaching Assistant: Karina Tovar
Special Thanks: Jason Fletcher, Eric Freeman, Max Azanow, R. Berred Ouellette
Sound Source Material: Adam Blake, Jacob Bohlan, Tom Fahey, Brendan Smith


1k Quicktime Freely Available

  • Available for planetarium use. Please contact me to obtain a download link.
  • 1k MOV or MP4

Terms: permission to freely screen to the public in planetariums as you see fit. You must screen the short in full and unedited. Not to be used in other shows without permission.


Screenings

Conferences & Festivals
— Melbourne International Film Festival 2014, Melbourne Planetarium (Melbourne, Australia)
— Further Fest 2017 (Nashville, TN)

International Planetariums
— ESO Supernova planetarium (Garching, Germany)
— GEMS American Academy, Planetarium (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates)
— Hvězdárna a Planetárium Brno (Brno, Czech Republic)
— Stuttgart Planetarium (Stuttgart, Germany)
— Digital Mobile Planetarium Wenu Mapu (Rio Negro, Argentina)
— ARK Dome (Geneva, Switzerland)
— Baikonur Planetarium (Poland)
— Gotoinc Planetarium (Calcutta, India)
— StratoSphere Domes (Eastbourne, England)
— Portable Planetarium (Novosibirsk, Russia)
— Portable Planetarium (Zhoushan, China)
— Scitech Planetarium, Scitech Discovery Centre (West Perth, Australia)
— Herne Observatory (Herne, Germany)
— Zhejiang Science and Technology Museum, Planetarium (Hangzhou, China)
— Çağ University, Space Observation & Research Center (Mersin, Turkey)
— Planet Crete (Crete, Greece)
— Portable Planetarium (Athens, Greece)
— JC Cinesferic (Madrid, Spain)
— Portable Planetarium (Huelva, Spain)

USA Planetariums
— Museum of Science, Charles Hayden Planetarium (Boston, MA)
— IAIA: Institute of American Indian Arts, Digital Dome (Santa Fe, NM)
— Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, Planetarium (Fort Collins, CO)
— Sudekum Planetarium, Adventure Science Center (Nashville, TN)
— Taylor Planetarium, Museum of the Rockies (Bozeman, MT)
— Arvin Gottlieb Planetarium, Science City (Kansas City, MO)
— Northside ISD Planetarium (San Antonio, TX)
— Science Museum of Virginia, Planetarium (Richmond, VA)
— SMSU Planetarium (Marshall, MN)
— Neag Planetarium, Reading Public Museum (Reading, PA)
— University of Texas at Arlington Planetarium (Arlington, TX)
— Chapel of Sacred Mirrors [CoSM], Dome (Wappingers Falls, New York)
— COSI Planetarium (Columbus, OH)
— Acheson Planetarium, Cranbrook Institute of Science (Bloomfield Hills, MI)
— Tarleton State University, Planetarium (Stephenville, TX)
— SciTech Museum, Planetarium (Aurora, IL)
— Hatter Planetarium, Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA)
— Framingham State University Planetarium (Framingham, MA)
— Collier County Public Schools, Portable Planetarium (Naples, FL)

Distributors
— ESO Fulldome Archive
— Dome Club (UK)
— British Fulldome Institute
— Kosmos Scientific de México

MassArt_Sentient_Poster

Waiting Far Away – Fulldome Short

An explorer of the cosmos has traveled too far… And can’t find home.
Follow in the footsteps of a cosmic traveler as he shares a wild story. Find out what grand mysteries he has uncovered while journeying deep into intergalactic space, searching…

In the creative process of producing planetarium shows, we often come across imagery that is stunning but doesn’t work in the context of a science show. And so our collection of fulldome astronomy art animations has matured into a hybrid form of storytelling where we mix imagination with real data.

What particularly excites us about backburner short projects, is that we produce them quickly. It’s refreshing to just have a clear vision and then immediately crank it out. In the future we plan to continue creating fulldome shorts. Our next short will have a bleeding edge science topic to focus on. But we have other ideas for experiences in outer space that don’t fit your typical science show. More to come!


Domemasters Freely Available

  • Available for planetarium use. Please contact me to obtain a download link.
  • 4k domemaster frames, 30fps, 5.1 surround & stereo audio
  • 2k MOV or MP4
  • 1k MOV or MP4

Terms: permission to freely screen to the public in planetariums as you see fit. You must screen the short in full and unedited. Not to be used in other shows without permission.


Translations

Wish to translate and record the narration into a language that better suits your audience? Let me know and I can share the music-only mix with you.

Languages Available
— Czech
— English
— Farsi
— French
— German
— Korean
— Portuguese
— Russian
— Spanish (Castilian)
— Telugu

Translations In Progress
— Arabic
— Chinese
— Dutch
— Hawaiian
— Hungarian
— Italian
— Polish
— Spanish (Latin American)


Interactive 360° Video


Screenings

Conferences & Festivals
— Melbourne International Film Festival 2016 (Melbourne, Australia)
— Buenos Aires Independent Film Festival 2016 (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
SIGGRAPH 2015: VR Village Dome (Los Angeles, CA)
— Geneva International Film Festival / Festival Tous Écrans 2015 (Geneva, Switzerland)
— Jena Fulldome Festival 2014 (Jena, Germany)
— European Symposium of Planetariums 2014 (Lucerne, Switzerland)
— Further Fest 2017 (Nashville, TN)

International Planetariums
— Macao Science Center Planetarium (Macao, China)
— Planetarium Wolfsburg (Wolfsburg, Germany)
— Sri Sathya Sai Space Theatre (Puttaparthi, India)
— Baikonur Planetarium (Poland)
— Il Planetario (Bologna, Italy)
— Orbit Night Sky Planetarium (Kolkata, India)
— Roi-Et Planetarium, Science and Cultural Center for Education (Phitsanulok, Thailand)
— Dome Club (Birmingham, UK)
— Planetarium Toruń (Torun, Poland)
— Astropokaz Planetarium (Poland)
— Fireball Planetarium (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)
— Planetario Digital Carl Sagan (Parana, Argentina)
— Tusi-Bohm Planetarium (Baku, Azerbaijan)
— Quasar Planetarium (Olkusz, Poland)
— Planetarium and Observatory of Cà del Monte (Cecima, Italy)
— Grupo Astronomico Silos (Zaragoza, Spain)
— The Heavens of Copernicus Planetarium, Copernicus Science Centre (Warsaw, Poland)
— Portable Planetarium (India)
— Portable Planetarium (France)
— Cosmos Planetarium (Scotland)
— Planetarium RCRE (Opole, Poland)
— Museum of Paleontology Egidio Feruglio, Portable Planetarium (Trelew, Argentina)
— Planetario de Bogotá (Bogotá, Colombia)
— Eugenides Planetarium (Athens, Greece)
— Portable Planetarium (Natal, Brazil)
— Portable Planetarium (Brazil)
— Portable Planetarium (Bolivia, South America)
— Sternwarte und Planetarium der Stadt Radebeul (Radebeul, Germany)
— Portable Planetarium (India)
— Portable Planetarium (Brazil)
— Portable Planetarium (Sussex, England)
— Portable Planetarium (Russia)
— Planetarium de Bretagne (Pleumeur-Bodou, France)
— Illusion Planetarium (Tyumen, Russia)
— Strasbourg Planetarium, Université de Strasbourg (Strasbourg, France)
— Astronomy Club of Feira de Santana, Antares Observatory (Bahia, Brazil)
— Portable Planetarium (Poland, Katowice)
— Planetarium of Nantes (Nantes, France)
— Planetarium Hamburg (Hamburg, Germany)
— Portable Planetarium (Matera, Italy)
— Immersive Vision Theatre, Plymouth University (Plymouth, UK)
— Portable Planetarium (Valencia, Spain)
— Digital Mobile Planetarium Wenu Mapu (Rio Negro, Argentina)
— Planetarium Sultan Iskandar (Sarawak, Malaysia)
— ESO Supernova planetarium (Garching, Germany)
— Planetarium Minikosmos (Lichtenstein, Germany)
— Planetarium Man (Northampton, UK)
— Guru Graha Planetarium (Andhra Pradesh, India)
— Zeiss-Planetarium Jena (Jena, Germany)
— Techmania Science Center, Planetarium (Pilsen, Czech Republic)
— Planetarium Photon (Nizhny Tagil, Russia)
— Hvězdárna a Planetárium Brno (Brno, Czech Republic)
— Metaspace Planetarium (Seoul, Korea)
— Portable Planetarium (Cape Town, South Africa)
— Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Portable Planetarium (Heidelberg, Germany)
— Portable Planetarium (Vic-la-Gardiole, France)
— Planetarium of Occhiobello (Santa Maria Maddalena, Italy)
— Portable Planetarium (Saskatoon, Canada)
— Planetarium Espacio 0.42 (Huesca, Spain)
— Banff National Park, Portable Planetarium (Banff, Canada)
— Portable Planetarium (Vietnam)
— Herne Observatory (Herne, Germany)
— Planetario da UFSC, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Florianópolis, Brazil)
— DomeEKB Portable Planetarium (Ekaterinburg, Russia)
— Universo Ludico (Bogota, Colombia)
— GEMS American Academy, Planetarium (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates)
— ARK Dome (Geneva, Switzerland)
— Portable Planetarium (Pretoria, South Africa)
— Portable Planetarium (Krasnoyarsk, Siberia)
— Portable Planetarium (Karnataka, India)
— Portable Planetarium (Mexico)
— Portable Planetarium (Moscow, Russia)
— Portable Planetarium (Guatemala City, Guatemala)
— Portable Planetarium (Kenya, Africa)
— Anápolis Planetarium (Anápolis, Brazil)
— Stuttgart Planetarium (Stuttgart, Germany)
— Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Planetarium (Mashhad, Iran)
— The Adelaide Planetarium, University of South Australia (Adelaide, South Australia)
— StratoSphere Domes (Eastbourne, England)
— Cosmodrome (Gank, Belgium)
— EGPlanetarium (Italy)
— Ufa Planetarium (Ufa, Russia)
— Valentina Tereshkova Planetarium (Yaroslavl, Russia)
— Portable Planetarium (Novosibirsk, Russia)
— Mobilní Planetárium (Prague, Czech Republic)
— Zeiss Planetarium Drebach (Drebach, Germany)
— Portable Planetarium (Zhoushan, China)
— Scitech Planetarium, Scitech Discovery Centre (West Perth, Australia)
— Esfera Espacial Planetarium (Chiapas, Mexico)
— Portable Planetarium (Marbela, Spain)
— Nicolaus Copernicus Planetarium (Nürnberg, Germany)
— Gwacheon National Science Museum (Gwacheon, South Korea)
— Utazó Planetárium (Budapest, Hungary)
— Edudomo Planetarium (Veracruz, Mexico)
— Il Planetario di Nemesis (Italy)
— Planetarium Mobilne Grawiton (Warsaw, Poland)
— Interactive Science Museum, Newton Park (Krasnoyarsk, Russia)
— Zhejiang Science and Technology Museum, Planetarium (Hangzhou, China)
— Portable Planetarium (Czech Republic)
— Kiev Planetarium (Kiev, Ukraine)
— Wellington Museum (Wellington, New Zealand)
— NEST Dome (Québec, Canada)
— Interactive Museum of Xalapa, Planetarium (Veracruz, Mexico)
— SAO64 Dome (Hendaye, France)
— Immersive-Me Dome (London, UK)
— Orion Education Planetarium (Bangalore, India)
— The Soluis Group, Upright Portable Dome (London, UK)
— Planetario de Lima (Chorrillos, Peru)
— EyeDome Cinema (Yerevan, Armenia)
— İstek Vakfı Belde Okulları, Planetarium (Istanbul, Turkey)
— Portable Planetarium (Nellore, India)
— Astronomical Society of Mexico (Baja California, Mexico)
— Skyward Planetarium (Tamil Nadu, India)
— Planetário Digital Mauro de Souza Lima (Garanhuns, Brazil)
— Çağ University, Space Observation & Research Center (Mersin, Turkey)
— Baku Talent School, Planetarium (Baku, Azerbaijan)
— Coats Observatory, Planetarium (Paisley, Scotland)
— Planet Crete (Crete, Greece)
— Tashkent Planetarium (Tashkent, Uzbekistan)
— Portable Planetarium (Athens, Greece)
— Planetario Malargüe (Mendoza, Argentina)
— Pokhara Planetarium and Science Centre (Pokhara, Nepal)
— JC Cinesferic (Madrid, Spain)
— Scientific Club Dome (Doha, Qatar)
— Planetarium Royal Observatory of Belgium (Brussels, Belgium)
— Portable Planetarium (Loja, Ecuador)
— Portable Planetarium (Huelva, Spain)

USA Planetariums
— Museum of Science, Charles Hayden Planetarium (Boston, MA)
— East Village Planetarium, The Girls Club (New York, NY)
— Hokulani Imaginarium, Windward Community College (Kaneohe, Hawaii)
— Daniel M. Soref Planetarium, Milwaukee Public Museum (Milwaukee, WI)
— Dr. Sandra F. Pritchard Mather Planetarium, West Chester University (West Chester, PA)
— University of Alaska Anchorage Planetarium (Anchorage, Alaska)
— Ward Beecher Planetarium, Youngstown State University (Youngstown, OH)
— Boonshoft Museum of Discovery Planetarium (Dayton, OH)
— Acheson Planetarium, Cranbrook Institute of Science (Bloomfield Hills, MI)
— Neag Planetarium, Reading Public Museum (Reading, PA)
— Longway Planetarium, Sloan Museum (Flint, MI)
— University of Texas at Arlington Planetarium (Arlington, TX)
— Rollins Planetarium, Young Harris College (Young Harris, GA)
— Wausau School District Planetarium (Wausau, WI)
— Sudekum Planetarium, Adventure Science Center (Nashville, TN)
— Raritan Valley Community College Planetarium (Somerville, NJ)
— Delta College Planetarium (Bay City, MI)
— Buhl Planetarium, Carnegie Science Center (Pittsburgh, PA)
— Maynard F. Jordan Planetarium, The University of Maine (Orono, ME)
— Obscura Digital (San Francisco, CA)
— Peoria Riverfront Museum, Planetarium (Peoria, IL)
— Glastonbury Planetarium (Glastonbury, CT)
— Edelman Planetarium, Rowan University (Glassboro, NJ)
— Harlan Rowe Middle School Planetarium (Athens, PA)
— Hallstrom Planetarium, Indian River State College (Fort Pierce, FL)
— Starlab Portable Planetarium (Massillon, OH)
— Charles W. Brown Planetarium, Ball State University (Muncie, IN)
— Flandrau Science Center & Planetarium, The University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
— Dreyfuss Planetarium, Newark Museum (Newark, NJ)
— Clark Planetarium (Salt Lake City, UT)
— Downing Planetarium, Fresno State (Fresno, CA)
— Gates Planetarium, Denver Museum of Nature and Science (Denver, CO)
— Ask Jeeves Planetarium, Chabot Space & Science Center (Oakland, CA)
— Truman State University Planetarium (Kirksville, MO)
— SUNY Oneonta Planetarium (Oneonta, NY)
— Portable Planetarium (Antioch, CA)
— Arthur Storer Planetarium (Prince Frederick, MD)
— Adler Planetarium (Chicago, IL)
— York Learning Center Planetarium, York County Astronomical Society (North York, PA)
— COSI Planetarium (Columbus, OH)
— FLHS Planetarium (Fair Lawn, NJ)
— Austin Mobile Planetarium (Austin, TX)
— Argus IMRA Planetarium (Ann Arbor, MI)
— Anchorage Museum, Planetarium (Anchorage, AK)
— Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium (Fort Myers, FL)
— Northside ISD Planetarium (San Antonio, TX)
— SMSU Planetarium (Marshall, MN)
— Roberson Museum and Science Center (Binghamton, NY)
— West Virginia University Planetarium (Morgantown, WV)
— University of Michigan, Museum of Natural History, Planetarium (Ann Arbor, MI)
— The Children’s Museum (West Hartford, CT)
— Fort Lupton High School, Planetarium (Fort Lupton, CO)
— The Christa McAuliffe Center, FSU Planetarium (Framingham, MA)
— Williamsville Space Lab Planetarium (Williamsville, NY)
— Christenberry Planetarium (Birmingham, AL)
— Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, Planetarium (Fort Collins, CO)
— Chabot College Planetarium (Hayward, CA)
— Science Museum of Virginia, Planetarium (Richmond, VA)
— IAIA: Institute of American Indian Arts, Digital Dome (Santa Fe, NM)
— Chapel of Sacred Mirrors [CoSM], Dome (Wappingers Falls, New York)
— Eastern Michigan University, Planetarium (Ypsilanti, MI)
— Los Alamos Nature Center, Planetarium (Los Alamos, NM)
— New Mexico Museum of Space History, Tombaugh Planetarium (Alamogordo, NM)
— Manheim Township Planetarium (Lancaster, PA)
— Illinois State University Planetarium (Normal, IL)
— Planetarium at the College of Southern Nevada (Henderson, NV)
— Gheens Science Hall & Rauch Planetarium, University of Louisville (Louisville, KY)
— North Museum of Nature and Science, Planetarium (Lancaster, PA)
— SciTech Museum, Planetarium (Aurora, IL)
— Hatter Planetarium, Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA)
— John Glenn High School Planetarium (Westland, Michigan)
— Kalamazoo Valley Museum, Planetarium (Kalamazoo, MI)
— Collier County Public Schools, Portable Planetarium (Naples, FL)

Distributors
— ESO Fulldome Archive
— Sky-Skan
— Spitz: Scidome Network
— ZEISS Powerdomes
— Digitalis Education Solutions
— Fulldome Film Society
— Dome Club (UK)
— British Fulldome Institute
— EnterIdeas
— Emerald Digital Planetariums
— Loch Ness Productions
— LSS Planetariums Open Project
— Metaspace
— E&S Digistar Cloud Library
— Adventure Domes
— Altair Digital
— Kosmos Scientific de México

Visuals by Wade Sylvester & Jason Fletcher – Music & Narration by Wade Sylvester
Charles Hayden Planetarium, Museum of Science. Copyright 2014. All Rights Reserved.

WaitingFarAway_PosterVertical_Updated

What Tau Sounds Like – Fulldome Short

Sometimes you just gotta act on inspiration. Upon first watching What Tau Sounds Like, I was inspired by the use of multiple camera viewpoints all connected by music. Just being able to see all the layers fit together and understand how one guy made this beautiful song. And I saw the potential for a unique portrayal of the music and math visually intertwining…

So as an initial music show sketch, I re-edited the video piece for an immersive fulldome environment. While I generally don’t like to put rectangle video footage on the dome, well I figured I should break my own rules and see how far I could push the idea. It was an interesting first experiment in compositing video footage into an immersive experience.

What Tau Sounds Like was originally created by Michael Blake. The song is available on the iTunes store. I did not record the video or audio, I just adapted and enhanced it for the dome. This fulldome version of the video is shared with permission by Michael Blake. Tools used in After Effects: Navegar Fulldome Plugin, Escher’s Droste Plugin, and Fractal Explorer Plugin. The footage of the children running is originally from a PSA: Save the Children – Running Around the World.


1k Quicktime Freely Available

  • Available for planetarium use. Please contact me to obtain a download link.
  • 1k MOV or MP4

Terms: permission to freely screen to the public in planetariums as you see fit. You must screen the short in full and unedited. Not to be used in other shows without permission.


Screenings

Conferences & Festivals
— Further Fest 2017 (Nashville, TN)

International Planetariums
— Immersive Vision Theatre, Plymouth University (Plymouth, UK)
— Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Portable Planetarium (Heidelberg, Germany)
— StratoSphere Domes (Eastbourne, England)
— Portable Planetarium (Novosibirsk, Russia)
— Çağ University, Space Observation & Research Center (Mersin, Turkey)
— Planet Crete (Crete, Greece)
— Portable Planetarium (Athens, Greece)
— JC Cinesferic (Madrid, Spain)
— Portable Planetarium (Huelva, Spain)

USA Planetariums
— Museum of Science, Charles Hayden Planetarium (Boston, MA)
— Fort Collins Museum of Discovery Planetarium (Fort Collins, CO)
— Sudekum Planetarium, Adventure Science Center (Nashville, TN)
— Maynard F. Jordan Planetarium, The University of Maine (Orono, ME)
— Arthur Storer Planetarium (Prince Frederick, MD)
— COSI Planetarium (Columbus, OH)
— Acheson Planetarium, Cranbrook Institute of Science (Bloomfield Hills, MI)
— Chaffee Planetarium, Grand Rapids Public Museum (Grand Rapids, MI)
— SciTech Museum, Planetarium (Aurora, IL)
— Collier County Public Schools, Portable Planetarium (Naples, FL)

Distributors
— Kosmos Scientific de México