Using Real Pluto Imagery – From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA

In producing From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA we made the exciting but perilous decision to include the New Horizons mission within our story. So we made an early bet that the mission would be a success…

As you well know, New Horizons has given us an amazing close-up look at Pluto. And so we are excited to announce that we have updated the show to include the latest real images of Pluto and Charon!

Collection of 360° Video Rigs

360-video-rig-collection

360° video is growing by leaps and bounds. No doubt about it.

And it’s fascinating to see all the different approaches to capturing 360° video. So I surveyed the current 360° video rigs being offered and then organized every serious option into this epic listing. The results are telling…

If you’re new to 360 video, then you have much to wrap your mind around. I suggest checking out my blog post: 360 Video Fundamentals. Or to gain a comprehensive understanding check out the Making360 open source book.

CATEGORIES
Comparison of 360° Video Rig Categories
360° Map Projection
360° Video Rigs: Multi Camera
360° Video Rigs: Single Camera Body
360° Video Rigs: Stereoscopic
360° Video Rigs: Stereoscopic / Single Camera Body
360° Video Rigs: Scuba
360° Video Rigs: Scuba Stereoscopic
360° Video Rigs: Invisible Drone
360° Video Rigs: First-Person POV
360° Camera Motion: Remote Control Cars
360° Camera Motion: Gyro Stabilization
360° Video Streaming Hardware
Partial 360° Video Rigs
Partial 360° Video Rigs: Stereoscopic
Cylindrical Video Rigs
Cylindrical Video Rigs: Stereoscopic
Cylindrical Video Rigs: Parabolic Mirror
360° Light Field Rigs
360° Photography Rigs
Fisheye Video Rigs
Fisheye Video Rigs: Stereoscopic
Fisheye Lens: GoPro or MFT Cameras
360° Video Rigs: Less than 30fps
360° Video Rigs: Wild and Unique
360° Video Rigs: DIY 3D Printing
Unsuccessful Kickstarter Projects
History of 360° Film

Updated with latest 360° cameras on March 5, 2017


Comparison of 360° Video Rig Categories

There are many different types of 360° video rigs, but not all of them capture the full 360×180° field of view (FOV). And so I’ve placed each rig into a specific category. Sometimes you don’t need to capture absolutely everything. It all depends on how you’re going to use the footage.

For instance, if you’re using a tripod then perhaps you could ignore that footage zone (partial 360°). Maybe the main focus is happening along the horizon, then you might not need to capture the sky and immediate ground (cylindrical). Or maybe you just need to capture the events happening directly in front of you (fisheye). Or maybe you want the big challenge, capturing 3D depth (stereoscopic).

Below I’ve outlined the typical FOV coverage of each rig category: 360°, partial 360°, cylindrical, and fisheye. But these are just averaged examples of each category, sometimes there are outliers which have much higher or lower FOV.

comparison-of-360-video-rig-categories-20170202
Source Image by Andrey Salnikov: “Climbing Volcano Teide”


360° Map Projection

Equirectangular, LatLong, Spherical, 360°… All of these terms refer to the same exact format: the Equidistant Cylindrical Projection. It is currently the most widely used format for stitched 360° video.

So how does it work? This is a precise geometric method for converting a sphere into a flat image with a 2:1 ratio. So this format can be seamlessly wrapped onto a sphere and back again.

360×180° is the standard for expressing a complete spherical capture. But why not 360×360°? Because we are measuring an arc for the latitude, not a complete circle.

360x180_explanation


360° Video Rigs: Multi Camera

These multi camera rigs capture monoscopic 360° video. A majority of producers are currently shooting with these type of rigs.

GoPro: Omni
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
— genlocked
Tutorial: the full workflow
GoPro-Omni

Freedom360: Freedom360 Classic Mount
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
Freedom360-Freedom360-Mount

Freedom360: F360 Explorer
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
— all weather
Freedom360-F360-Explorer

360Rize: Uni360
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 cameras (compatible with: GoPro Hero2, Hero3, Hero4, Hero5 Black, Hero5 Session, YI 4K Action Camera)
— all weather
360rize-uni360

360Rize: 360H6
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
— all weather
360heros-360h6-rig

WetHot360
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro Hero Session cameras
— all weather

360Rize: PRO6
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
360Heros-Pro6

Varavon: VR-GH6
— full coverage: 360×180°, 8 GoPro cameras
varavon-vr-gh6

360Rize: PRO7
— full coverage: 360×180°, 7 GoPro cameras
360Heros-Pro7

360Rize: PRO10HD
— full coverage:  360×180°, 10 GoPro cameras
360Heros-H3Pro10HD

Varavon: VR-GH12
— full coverage: 360×180°, 16 GoPro cameras
varavon-vr-gh12-rig

SimplifyVR
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
— all weather option
SimplifyVR-Rigs

iZugar: Z2X
— full coverage: 360×180°, 2 GoPro cameras with custom 194° fisheye lens
izugar-z2x-armor

iZugar: Z3X
— full coverage: 360×180°, 3 GoPro cameras with custom 185° fisheye lens
iZugar-Z3X

Freedom360: Freedom360 Trio
— full coverage: 360×180°, 3 GoPro cameras with Back-Bone Ribcage to allow for custom fisheye lens
freedom360-broadcaster-3x

Radiant Images: VR 360 GoPro Periscope
— full coverage: 360×180°, 3 modified GoPro cameras with 220° fisheye lens

iZugar: Z4XC
— full coverage: 360×180°, 4 GoPro cameras with custom 185° fisheye lens
izugar-z4x-armor

iZugar: Z4XL
— full coverage: 360×180°, 4 Z-Cam E1 cameras (with 220° fisheye lens)
izugar-z4xl

Back-Bone: 360 VR Mounts
— full coverage: 360×180°, GoPro cameras with Back-Bone Ribcage to allow for custom fisheye lens
BackBone-360-VR-Mounts

360 Designs: Mini EYE 4
— full coverage: 360×180°, 4 Blackmagic Micro Cinema cameras or Blackmagic Micro Studio cameras (with fisheye lens)
— can be genlocked
360-Designs_Mini-EYE-4

360 Designs: Mini EYE 3
— full coverage: 360×180°, 3 Blackmagic Micro Cinema cameras or Blackmagic Micro Studio cameras (with fisheye lens)
— can be genlocked
360-Designs_Mini-EYE-3

Radiant Images: Blackmagic Micro VR 360
— full coverage: 360×180°, 3 Blackmagic Micro Cinema cameras or Blackmagic Micro Studio cameras (with fisheye lens)

360Rize: 360Helios 3
— full coverage: 360×180°, 3 Blackmagic Micro Cinema cameras or Blackmagic Micro Studio cameras (with 190° fisheye lens)
— can be genlocked
360helios-3

360Rize: 360Helios 6
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 Blackmagic Micro Cinema cameras or Blackmagic Micro Studio cameras (with 190° fisheye lens)
— can be genlocked
360helios-6

360Rize: 360Helios 7
— full coverage: 360×180°, 7 Blackmagic Micro Cinema cameras or Blackmagic Micro Studio cameras (with 190° fisheye lens)
— can be genlocked
360helios-7

360Rize: 360Helios 8
— full coverage: 360×180°, 8 Blackmagic Micro Cinema cameras or Blackmagic Micro Studio cameras (with 190° fisheye lens)
— can be genlocked
360helios-8

Radiant Images: AXA 360
— full coverage: 360×180°, 10 digital cinema cameras

Radiant Images: Sense 9
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, 7 Canon C300 Mark II cameras (also supports many digital cinema cameras)

Mooovrig
— full coverage: 360×180°, 5 Canon mirrorless cameras (with 180° fisheye lens)
Mooovrig

Rig 360 for A01
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, 7 Olympus Air A01 cameras (with fisheye lens)

Bonsai 360° / Cutlass 360° / Excalibur 360°
— full coverage: 360×180°, 4 DSLR or MILC cameras (with fisheye lens)

Kodak: PIXPRO SP360 4k – Dual Pro Pack
— full coverage: 360×180°, 2 Kodak PIXPRO SP360 4k cameras
Kodak-PIXPRO-SP360-4k-Dual-Pro-Pack

Elmo: QBiC Panorama
— full coverage: 360×180°, 4 Elmo QBiC MS-1 cameras
— all weather
Elmo-QBiC-Panorama

Freedom360: Elmo360
— full coverage: 360×180°, 4 Elmo QBiC MS-1 cameras
— all weather
Freedom360-Elmo360

Casio: Exilim EX-FR200 – (using the 360 mount: EAM-8)
— full coverage: 360×180°, 2 detachable lens modules (185° fisheye lens)
— all weather
Casio-Exilim-EX-FR200-360-rig-using-EAM8

Embrace Cinema Gear: VR 360° Camera Rigs
— full coverage: 360×180°, various camera rigs
embrace-cinema-gear_vr-360-camera-rigs


360° Video Rigs: Single Camera Body

These cameras capture monoscopic 360° video through the use of a single camera body with multiple sensors/lenses. Since it behaves as a single unit there are less problems that can arise. But they cannot currently obtain the same high resolution as a multi camera rig.

Sphericam 2
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 6 sensors
— global shutter, genlocked
sphericam-2-camera

Samsung: Gear 360
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (195° fisheye lens)
— underwater depth rating: 40m or 131ft (with case accessory)
Samsung-Gear-360

Samsung: Gear 360 (2017)
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 9 sensors (fisheye lenses)
— 4k resolution limited to 24fps

Nikon: KeyMission 360
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
— 4k & 1080 resolutions limited to 24fps
— underwater depth rating: 30m or 100ft
Nikon-KeyMission360

Kodak: PIXPRO Orbit360 4k
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (with lens covers: 235° & 155° fisheye lenses / without lens covers: 244° & 163° fisheye lenses)
— 4k resolution limited to 24fps
kodak-pixpro-orbit360-4k

GoPro: Fusion
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, single camera body with 2 sensors

Ricoh: Theta S
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (190° fisheye lens)
teardown of camera
Ricoh-Theta-S

Ricoh: R Development Kit
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (190° fisheye lens)
ricoh-r-development-kit

Ricoh: Theta SC
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (190° fisheye lens)
— limited to 5 minutes of video recording
ricoh-theta-sc

LG: 360 Cam
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (200° fisheye lens)
LG-360-Cam

Insta360: 4k
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (230° fisheye lens)
Insta360-4k

YI 360 VR Camera
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (220° fisheye lens)

Detu: Twin
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
detu-twin

Idealoeye: C2
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (190° fisheye lens)
idealoeye-c2

Luna
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (190° fisheye lens)
Luna-360-camera

Indiecam: nakedEYE
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
Indiecam-nakedEYE

Zmer: Sports Camera
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
zmer-sports-camera

Orah: 4i
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 4 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
— genlocked?
Orah-4i

Bublcam
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 4 sensors (190° fisheye lens)
Bublcam-Rig

Vantrix: PRO4-DUAL
—full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (182° panomorph lens)

GO6D: Trie
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 3 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
GO6D-Trie

Z-Cam S1
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 4 sensors (190° fisheye lens)
z-cam-s1

Z-Cam Radius
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 4 sensors (FOV of MFT fisheye lens unknown)
z-cam-s1-pro

Idealoeye: C4
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 4 sensors (185° fisheye lens)
idealoeye-c4-camera

Detu: F4
— full coverage: 360×170°, single camera body with 4 sensors (190° fisheye lens)
detu-f4

Sphericam: Beast
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 4 sensors (190° fisheye lens)
— genlocked?
sphericam-beast

Absolute Zero
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 12 sensors
— genlocked
absolute-zero

SoniCam
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 9 sensors (fisheye lenses)

Insta360: Air
— full coverage: 360×180°, Android attachment with 2 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
insta360-air

Insta360: Nano
— full coverage: 360×180°, iPhone attachment with 2 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
Insta360-Nano-iPhone-attachment

Giroptic: iO
— full coverage: 360×180°, iPhone attachment with 2 sensors (195° fisheye lens)
giroptic-io

Dunkam
— full coverage: 360×180°, Android attachment with 2 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
dunkam

Zmer: Live
— full coverage: 360×180°, Android attachment with 2 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
zmer-live


360° Video Rigs: Stereoscopic

Stereoscopic rigs allow for 360° video to be captured for both your left and right eyes, so a true sense of depth can be achieved in VR. 360-3D is the ultimate dream, but there are many challenges that make it difficult to shoot in 360-3D and not give the viewer a very frustrating experience. (Example problems include: parallax error differences between eyes, exposure differences between eyes, genlocking cameras, getting complete stereo coverage without ignoring the poles, and such big headaches.) The terms stereoscopic, 3D, and S-3D can be used interchangeably.

Facebook: Surround 360
— full coverage: 360×180°, 17 Point Grey cameras (one 185° fisheye lens facing up and two 185° fisheye lenses facing down)
— global shutter, genlocked
open source stitching softwaremore info
Facebook-Surround-360

Facebook: Surround 360 x24 / Surround 360 x6
—full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 6 or 24 sensors

360Rize: 360Orb
— full coverage:  360×180°, 24 GoPro cameras
360Heros-360Orb

360Rize: 3DPRO12
— full coverage: 360×180°, 12 GoPro cameras
360Heros-3DH3Pro12

360Rize: 3DPRO12H
— full coverage: 360×180°, 12 GoPro cameras
360Heros-3DH3Pro12H

360Rize: 3DPRO14H
— full coverage: 360×180°, 14 GoPro cameras
360Heros-3DH3Pro14H

iZugar: Z6X3D
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras with custom 194° fisheye lens
iZugar-Z6X3D

NextVR
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, 6 EPIC-M RED Dragon cameras
— global shutter, can be genlocked
NextVR-Digital-Cinema-Camera

HypeVR
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, 14 EPIC-M RED Dragon cameras
— collects LiDAR data with the Velodyne HDL-32E
— global shutter, can be genlocked
HypeVR-Rig

Cinegears: Hex VR Rig
— coverage: FOV varies based on setup, 6 to 14 digital cinema cameras
cinegears-hex-vr-rig

Radiant Images: Codex ActionCam VR 360 Blossom
— full coverage: 360×180°, 17 Codex ActionCam cameras
— global shutter, genlocked?
Radiant-Images-Codex-ActionCam-VR-360-Blossom

360 Designs: EYE
— full coverage: 360×180°, 8 to 42 cameras depending on configuration: Blackmagic Design Micro Cinema Camera (self-contained) or Blackmagic Design Micro Studio Camera 4k (wired operation)
— can be genlocked
360-Designs-EYE

WeMakeVR: Falcon VR Camera
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 14 sensors
WeMakeVR-Falcon-VR-Camera

Panocam3D: POD
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 18 sensors
Panocam-HMC


360° Video Rigs: Stereoscopic / Single Camera Body

These cameras capture stereoscopic 360° video through the use of a single camera body with multiple sensors/lenses. Since it behaves as a single unit there are less problems that can arise. Stereoscopic rigs allow for 360° video to be captured for both your left and right eyes, so a true sense of depth can be achieved in VR. 360-3D is the ultimate dream, but there are many challenges that make it difficult to shoot in 360-3D and not give the viewer a very frustrating experience. (Example problems include: parallax error differences between eyes, exposure differences between eyes, genlocking cameras, getting complete stereo coverage without ignoring the poles, and such big headaches.) The terms stereoscopic, 3D, and S-3D can be used interchangeably.

Jaunt: ONE – J1-24G
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 24 sensors
— 24G: global shutter, 24R: rolling shutter, genlocked
The Cinematic VR Field Guide
Jaunt-ONE

Nokia: OZO+
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 8 sensors (195° fisheye lens)
— global shutter, genlocked
Nokia-OZO

Insta360: Pro
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 6 sensors (200° fisheye lens)
insta360-pro-camera

Vuze
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 8 sensors
vuze-camera-on-tripod

Samsung: Project Beyond
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 18 sensors

KanDao: Obsidian R / Obsidian S
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, single camera body with 6 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
— genlocked?

Live Planet
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 16 sensors (180° fisheye lens)
— genlocked

Hubblo
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, single camera body with 6 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
hubblo-camera

Z-Cam V1 Pro
—full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 9 sensors

Idealoeye: P21
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 21 sensors
idealoeye-p21

DKVision Aura
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, single camera body with unknown amount of sensors


360° Video Rigs: Scuba

To take a 360° video rig underwater, you can’t simply put it within a glass box… The lens optics would be affected by the refraction of the water. So these rigs have built-in compensation and allow you to capture 360° without any problems.

360Rize: 360Abyss
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
— underwater depth rating: 1000m or 3280ft, negative/positive/neutral buoyancy (anodized or poly carbonate versions)
overview of the v4 redesign
360Heros-360Abyss

Kolor: Abyss
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
— underwater depth rating: 150m or 492ft
Kolor-Abyss-Rig

Varavon: VR-MARINE 6
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras with Entaniya 220° fisheye lenses and Back-Bone Ribcage
— underwater depth rating: 300m or 984ft
varavon-vr-marine-6

360Rize: H3ScubaH6
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
— underwater depth rating: 61m or 200ft
360Heros-H3ScubaH6

360Rize: 360SeaDak
— full coverage: 360×180°, 2 Kodak PIXPRO SP360 4k cameras
— underwater depth rating: 130m or 426ft
360rize-360seadak

Boxfish 360
— full coverage: 360×180°, 3 Z-Cam E1 cameras (185° fisheye lens)
— underwater depth rating: 300m or 984ft
boxfish-360

Varavon: VR-MARINE 3
— full coverage: 360×180°, 3 GoPro cameras with Entaniya 220° fisheye lenses and Back-Bone Ribcage
— underwater depth rating: 300m or 984ft
varavon-vr-marine-3

360bubble
— polycarbonate globe for suitable for Ricoh Theta S, Samsung Gear 360, Nikon Keymission 360, LG 360 CA
— underwater depth rating varies based on model: 4m (13ft) / 10m (33ft)
360bubble-underwater-housing


360° Video Rigs: Scuba Stereoscopic

Taking a 360° video rig underwater is a serious endeavor. And shooting in stereoscopic makes it even more difficult.

VRTUL 1
— full coverage: 360×180°, 9 Blackmagic Micro Studio cameras (with fisheye lens)
— underwater depth rating: 30m or 100ft, slightly positive buoyancy

VRTUL: AquaTerra
— full coverage: 360×180°, 30 GoPro cameras
— underwater depth rating: 40m or 131ft, neutral buoyancy
vrtul-aquaterra-rig-underwater


360° Video Rigs: Invisible Drone

Attaching a 360° video rig to a drone is easy. But allowing the drone itself to be hidden within the shot is a special trick.

3DR Solo Drone Quadcopter: 360 Mount for the Kodak PIXPRO SP360 4k
— full coverage: 360×180°, 2 PIXPRO SP360 4k cameras
3DR-Solo-Drone-Quadcopter-and-360-Mount-for-the-Kodak-PIXPRO-SP360-4k

Drone Volt: Drone Janus 360
— full coverage: 360×180°, 10 GoPro cameras
DroneVolt_Drone-Janus-360

360Rize: 360 Orb
— full coverage: 360×180°, 12 GoPro cameras
360Heros-360Orb

Spherie
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
Spherie-Drone

Queen B Robotics: Exo360
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 5 sensors (210° fisheye lens)
Queen-B-Robotics-Exo360

Flying EYE
— full coverage: 360×180°, 3 Blackmagic Micro Studio cameras (with fisheye lens)

Custom Drone Rigs
Gimbal-Guard: Kodak 360 rig
Fly 360°
Helicopter 360 Rig
Panono Drone
Pictures Fabryc: Alta8 VR 360 Drone with stabilization
NS VR Gimbal
Ammergauer Alpen: 360 video droneexample footage
Intel Realsense Drone
VR-Eye Cam – Drone Camera
Viooa – Drone Camera
Thanics: Halo
DJI Mavic Pro: Dual Gear 360 / DJI Mavic Pro: Gear 360 & Kodak SP360 4k

Stabilize 360 footage from a drone
How to Stabilize 360 Drone Footage in After Effects using the SkyBox Studio plugin


360° Video Rigs: First-Person POV

To tell the story from a first-person point of view, you have to be within their head. These rigs allow you to see though the actors eyes and capture their body movements too.

Radiant Images: Mobius POV VR 360
— full coverage: 360×180°, 17 GoPro cameras
Radiant-Images-Mobius-POV-VR-360

Varavon: VR Helmet
— full coverage: 360×180°, 17 GoPro cameras
varavon-vr-helmet

ADAPA: Nimbus VR
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, amount of GoPro cameras unknown
adapa-nimbus-vr

ADAPA: Pulsar VR
— full coverage: 360×180°, 23 GoPro cameras
adapa-pulsar-vr

Panocam3D: HMC
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 24 sensors
— stereoscopic
Panocam3D-HMC

Custom Helmet Rigs
360 Video Helmet Rig
Homemade Helmet Rig
Making a POV 360 Camera Rig


360° Camera Motion: Remote Control Cars

By using an R/C car, you can be hidden from the shot and also capture smooth motion. These options specifically include 360 video rigs.

Motion Impossible: Mantis 360°in the field photos
VRoomCam
Fly Through Films: Freefly Tero R/C Carvideo of rig
Miami 360 VR: Freefly Tero R/C Carphoto of rig
— 360 Virtual Tourist: HPI Savage Flux HP R/C Car – photo of rig
10 Camera Canon Vixia – Freefly Tero R/C Car
Dolly360
RigRoverphoto of rig


360° Camera Motion: Gyro Stabilization

Relying on a gyroscopic stabilizer is the best way to capture smooth motion while walking, driving, or flying. These active and passive stabilizers are specifically designed for 360 video rigs.

Kenyon Gyro Stabilizer
WenPod Tarzan-G & Tarzan-Aelectronic stabilization demo
Varavon Birdycam VR 360
TG20 360VR Stabilizer Gimbal
OwlDolly: Guru Air 360° Camera Stabilizer
OwlDolly: Guru 360° Camera Stabilizer
FeiyuTech G360 Panoramic Camera Gimbal
SkyEdge 360: active stabilization system
Ricoh Theta S and The Beholder gimbal rigexample footage
Polar Effect: Philon 360 stabilized camera rig (working prototype)video
Custom rig for skiing
Kodak PIXPRO Orbit360 gimball rig (Prototype)
Zhiyun Smooth-II hack


360° Video Streaming Hardware

Streaming live 360 video is a tricky challenge and requires special hardware to make it reliable. But with these specialized boxes you can easily monitor the video feeds, stitch, and stream to the web.

Teradek: Sphere
— Monitoring and streaming solution for up to 8 GoPro cameras
teradek-sphere


Partial 360° Video Rigs

These rigs are definitely thought of as 360° video because they capture the entire sky and horizon, but the ground isn’t captured (often the tripod).

Freedom360: F360 Broadcaster
— partial coverage: 360×140°, 6 GoPro cameras
Freedom360-F360-Broadcaster

360Rize: PRO6L
— partial coverage: 360×120°, 6 GoPro cameras
360Heros-H3Pro6N

Radiant Images: Dark Corner
— partial coverage: 360×155°, 4 Sony A7S MKII cameras (180° fisheye lens)
radiant-images-dark-corner

Totavision: Fulldome Camera
— partial coverage: 360×110°, 11 Toshiba IK-HD1 cameras
— cameras are placed around a virtual center. This arrangement allows parallax-free image stitching of distances larger than ~3 meters.
Totavision-Fulldome-Camera

Sphericam 1
— partial coverage: 360×138°, single camera body with 4 sensors (170° fisheye lens)
Sphericam-1

Immersive Media: Hex
— partial coverage: 360×144°, single camera body with 6 sensors
— 15fps at full resolution / 25fps at half resolution
Immersive-Media-Hex

Giroptic: 360cam
— partial coverage: 360×150°, single camera body with 3 sensors (185° fisheye lens)
Giroptic-360-Cam

PanoptikonVR
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, 14 GoPro cameras
— stereoscopic
PanoptikonVR


Partial 360° Video Rigs: Stereoscopic

These stereoscopic rigs are definitely thought of as 360° video because they capture the entire sky and horizon, but the ground isn’t captured (often the tripod).

YI HALO VR Camera
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, 17 YI 4k+ Action cameras

Varavon: VR-GS3D
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, 8 GoPro cameras
varavon-vr-gs3d


Cylindrical Video Rigs

These rigs only capture the horizon. So the sky and the ground are not captured. (But there are some tricks to fill in these empty areas, such as heavily blurring some of footage and stretching into this zone. Or taking a still photo prior to the shoot and patching it in later.)

360Rize: H3Pro7HD
— partial coverage: 360×120°, 7 GoPro cameras
360Heros-H3Pro7HD

Immersive Media: Quattro
— partial coverage: exact FOV unknown, single camera body with 4 sensors
— 15fps max
Immersive-Media-Quattro

Fraunhofer HHI: OmniCam-360
— partial coverage: 360×60°, 10 Micro HD cameras
— global shutter, genlocked?
— cameras are placed around a virtual center. This arrangement allows parallax-free image stitching of distances larger than 1 meter.
Fraunhofer-HHI-OmniCam360

Totavision: Cylindrical Camera
— partial coverage: 360×37°, 8 Toshiba IK-HD1 cameras
— cameras are placed around a virtual center. This arrangement allows parallax-free image stitching of distances larger than ~3 meters.
Totavision-Cylindrical-CameraPalace of Versailles footage / making-of


Cylindrical Video Rigs: Stereoscopic

These rigs only capture the horizon in stereo. So the sky and the ground are not captured. This approach makes dealing with stereo challenges much easier to swallow.

GoPro: Odyssey / Google Jump
— partial coverage: 360×120°, 16 GoPro cameras
— genlocked
— custom stitching service in the Google cloud: The Assembler
GoPro-Odyssey_Google-Jump

Intel: Voke VR
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, 12 custom cameras
— global shutter? genlocked?
voke-vr-camera-rig

Fraunhofer HHI: 3D OmniCam-360
— partial coverage: 360×60°, 20 Micro HD cameras
— global shutter, genlocked?
— cameras are placed around a virtual center. This arrangement allows parallax-free image stitching of distances larger than 2 meters.
Fraunhofer-HHI-3D-OmniCam360


Cylindrical Video Rigs: Parabolic Mirror

This technique has been around for a while. Basically one camera is precisely aimed at a specially crafted parabolic mirror. And so the mirror warps the whole horizon into the camera lens. But the sky and the ground are not captured. Since it only uses one camera, your end resolution is limited… But you don’t have to do any stitching. (Other major problems include: dust magnet, mirror surface quality, irregularly warping of image, image sharpness, and flares.)

(sphere) Pro
— partial coverage: exact FOV unknown, lens for a digital cinema camera or DSLR
sphere-pro

VSN Mobil: V.360
— partial coverage: 360×60°, single camera body with 1 sensor
VSN-Mobil-V360

Pano Pro MKII
— partial coverage: 360×120°, lens for a DSLR
Pano-Pro-MKII

0-360 Panoramic Optic
— partial coverage: 360×115°, lens for a DSLR
0-360-Panoramic-Optic

Eye Mirror
— partial coverage: exact FOV unknown, lens for a DSLR
Eye-Mirror

GoPano: Plus
— partial coverage: 360×100°, lens for a DSLR
GoPano-Plus

Eye Mirror: Wet Lens
— partial coverage: exact FOV unknown, lens for a DSLR
— underwater depth rating unknown
eyemirror-wet-lens

ActionCam360
— partial coverage: 360×90°, attachment for GoPro housing
— all weather
ActionCam360

Eye Mirror: GP 360
— partial coverage: exact FOV unknown, attachment for GoPro housing
— can go underwater up to 50m or 165ft
eye-mirror-gp360

Kogeto: Joey
— partial coverage: exact FOV unknown, single camera body with 1 sensor
Kogeto-Jo

Kogeto: Lucy
— partial coverage: 360×100°, single camera body with 1 sensor
in-depth experimentation
Kogeto-Lucy

Kogeto: Dot
— partial coverage: 360×63°, attachment for iPhone
Kogeto-Dot

BubbleScope
— partial coverage: 360×62°, attachment for iPhone
BubbleScope

GoPano: Micro
— partial coverage: 360×82°, attachment for iPhone
GoPano-micro

Remote Reality: Hummingbird360
— partial coverage: 360×70°, attachment for PointGrey Flea3 or Grasshopper
Remote-Reality-Hummingbird360

Interesting Research
Panoramic Stereo Videos Using a Single Camera and a 3D printed coffee-filter style mirror


360° Light Field Rigs

A 360° light field camera enables virtual views to be generated from any point, facing any direction, with any field of view. Meaning that you can experience Six Degrees of Freedom (6DoF), and you can actually lean into the shot and change your perspective. It is the holy grail of VR.

Lytro: Immerge
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, dense light field camera array
presentation by Jon Karafin (Head of Light Field Video for Lytro)
Lytro-Immerge

Interesting Research
OTOY 360 light field experiment
Axial-Cones: Modeling Spherical Catadioptric Cameras for Wide-Angle Light Field Rendering


360° Photography Rigs

There are a bunch of techniques to capture a 360° photo. But here are some photography rigs which automate or simplify the process.

Panono
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 36 sensors
Panono

NCTech: LASiris VR
— full coverage: 360×150°, single camera body
— photo camera and LiDAR scanner

NCTech: iSTAR Fusion
— partial coverage: 360×137°, single camera body with 4 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
nctech-istar-fusion

NCTech: iris360 Pro
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, single camera body with 4 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)

NCTech: iris360
— partial coverage: 360×137.5°, single camera body with 4 sensors (FOV of fisheye lens unknown)
NCTech-iris360

Tesseract: Methane
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, single camera body with 1 sensor

Ocam: Staro
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 17 sensors
ocam-staro

PanoHero
— full coverage: 360×180°, 1 GoPro camera
— stereo version available
panohero-pro-h

Squito
— coverage: exact FOV unknown, single camera body with 3 sensors
Squito

GigaPan: Epic
— motorized drive which automatically captures multi-gigapixel panoramas
GigaPan-Epic

Roundshot: VR Drive
— motorized drive which automatically captures multi-gigapixel panoramas
Roundshot-VR-Drive

BubblePod
— motorized turntable for smartphones, optional clip-on 120° lens
BubblePod

Pivotsphere
— tripod mount for manually shooting 360 photos with smartphone
pivotsphere-tripod-mount

Lomography: Spinner 360° / Motorizer
— 35mm still film camera for slit-scan photography
Spinner-360

Lomography: Fisheye One / Fisheye Submarine
— 35mm still film camera with built-in 170° fisheye lens (cropped fisheye image)
— underwater depth rating: 20m or 65ft
lomography-fisheye-one-camera

Fisheye lens attachments for iPhone/Android
photo mode: partially cropped fisheye image
video mode: mostly cropped fisheye image (video crop amount differs between iPhone & Android)
— lenses such as: Beastgrip, CamKix, iPro, iZZi Gadgets, Mobi-Lens, Olloclip, Optrix, Photojojo, Ztylus

And then there is this!
Guinness-2003-Worlds-Most-Useless-Invention


Fisheye Video Rigs

Shooting with a fisheye lens means that you’re capturing at least 180° and it’s being projected onto the camera sensor in a circular format. Fisheye footage can be projected directly into a dome and be instantly immersive. But the footage can easily be warped into the spherical format too.

Kodak: PIXPRO SP360 4k / PIXPRO SP360
— PIXPRO SP360 4k has built-in 235° fisheye lens
— PIXPRO SP360 has built-in 214° fisheye lens
— underwater depth rating: 60m or 197ft (with case accessory)
kodak-pixpro-sp360-4k-camera

360Fly 4k / 360Fly HD
— camera with built-in 240° fisheye lens
— 360Fly 4k – underwater depth rating: 10m or 33ft
— 360Fly HD – underwater depth rating: 50m or 165ft
360Fly-4k

iZugar: Z-Can E1 using MKX22 Lens
— Z-Cam E1 with a 220° fisheye lens
izugar-zcam-e1-using-mkx22-lens

Vantrix: PRO25 / AQUA Horizontal / AQUA Vertical / PRO4
— camera with built-in 182° panomorph lens
— underwater version has depth rating: 100m or 328ft

Casio: Exilim EX-FR200
— camera with detachable 185° fisheye lens
— all weather
Casio-Exilim-EX-FR200

Dome3D: GP185
— GoPro camera with custom 185° fisheye lens
Dome3D-GP185

Beon
— camera with built-in fisheye lens (FOV unknown)
beon-wrist-camera

MySight360
— camera with built-in 240° fisheye lens
— all weather
mysight360

CyclopsGear: Cyclops 360°
— camera with built-in 220° fisheye lens
— underwater depth rating: 50m or 165ft
cyclopsgear-cyclops360

Tamaggo
— camera with built-in 240° fisheye lens
Tamaggo-camera

Entaniya: Entapano C-01
— camera with built-in 183° fisheye lens
— all weather (with case accessory)
Entaniya-Entapano-C-01

Entaniya: Entapano2
— camera with built-in 250° fisheye lens
Entaniya-Entapano2

Camorama
— camera with built-in 230° fisheye lens
Camorama

Detu: Sphere S / Sphere 800
— camera with built-in 236° fisheye lens
detu-sphere-s

Oncam Evolution-12 Outdoor
— camera with built-in 185° fisheye lens
— 12fps at 9.6MP / 30fps at 2MP
— all weather (typically used as a security camera)
Oncam-Evolution12-Outdoor

Digital Cinema Camera Options
— RED Scarlet with fisheye lens experiments: Paul Bourke & Home Run Pictures
— below is a slide from the presentation: “Seeking the Ideal Fulldome Camera” by Jim Arthurs – (IMERSA Summit 2013)
IMERSA2013-SeekingTheIdealFulldomeCamera-JimArthurs

Cheap but Unproven Fisheye Cameras
Eken H8 – 170° fisheye lens
AMKOV AMK-100S – 220° fisheye lens / underwater depth rating: 30m or 100ft
CUBE360 GVT100M – 190° fisheye lens / max 28fps
Sunchip Panorama XDV360 – 220° fisheye lens
HDKing V1 Pro – 220° fisheye lens
X360 camera – 190° fisheye lens


Fisheye Video Rigs: Stereoscopic

Shooting with a fisheye lens means that you’re capturing at least 180° and it’s being projected onto the camera sensor in a circular format. But if you shoot with fisheye lenses that are higher than 180°, then you will see the lens itself within the edges of the shots. There are tricks to deal with this, but it’s an interesting challenge.

TwoEyes VR
— single camera body with 4 sensors (180° fisheye lens)
Kickstarter project
twoeyes-vr

Lucid Cam
— single camera body with 2 sensors (180° fisheye lens)
prototype adapter allows for 360° stereoscopic video
Lucid-Cam

IX Image: Omnipolar Camera Rig
— 3 cameras with fisheye lens
custom stitching solution to enable stereo stitching without pole region issues
— potential to create 360° video (3 cams facing up, 3 cams facing down)
IX-Image-Omnipolar-Camera-Rig

Tutorial
Building a 3D Camera: Wide-Angle Stereoscopic Video for Cinematic VR


Fisheye Lens: GoPro or MFT Cameras

360 video rigs can greatly benefit from using a fisheye lens to increase the amount of footage overlap, which allows the seams to be better hidden when stitched. A fisheye lens captures at least 180° and is projected onto the camera sensor in a circular format. Due to the necessary compact nature of 360 video rigs, only lenses which support GoPro cameras or MFT cameras (Micro Four Thirds) are listed below.

Entaniya: GoPro Fisheye Lenses
— 220°, 250°, 280° fisheye lenses for GoPro cameras using Back-Bone Ribcage
entaniya-gopro-fisheye-lenses

Entaniya: Fisheye Lens for MFT Cameras
— 250° fisheye lens for Micro Four Thirds cameras
entaniya-fisheye-250-lens-mft-mount

iZugar: MKX22 Fisheye Lens for MFT Cameras
— 220° fisheye lens for Micro Four Thirds cameras
izugar-zcam-e1-using-mkx22-lens

iZugar: Fisheye Lenses for GoPro Cameras
MKX13: 185° fisheye lens
MKX19: 194° fisheye lens
izugar-rigs-using-mkx13-and-mkx19-fisheye-lenses


360° Video Rigs: Less than 30fps

For VR and domes, a capture rate of at least 30 frames per seconds is an absolute requirement. Anything less and it’s simply too hard of an experience for the viewer.

ALLie
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (188° fisheye lens)
— 20fps
allie_camera

Ricoh: Theta m15
— full coverage: 360×180°, single camera body with 2 sensors (180° fisheye lens)
— 15fps, 5 minutes max of video recording
teardown of camera
Ricoh-Theta-m15

Point Grey: Ladybug5
— partial coverage: 360×162°, single camera body with 6 sensors
— 5fps uncompressed / 10fps compressed
— global shutter, genlocked?
in-depth experimentation
Point-Grey-Ladybug5

Point Grey: Ladybug3
— partial coverage: 360×144°, single camera body with 6 sensors
— 6.5fps uncompressed / 16fps compressed
— global shutter, genlocked?
Point-Grey-Ladybug3

Point Grey: Ladybug2
— partial coverage: 360×135°, single camera body with 6 sensors
— 15fps uncompressed / 30fps compressed
— global shutter, genlocked?
Point-Grey-Ladybug2

VideoPanoramas
— partial coverage: 360×162°, single camera body with 3 sensors
— 10 FPS at 5MP / 15 FPS at 3MP / 30 FPS at 1.3MP
VideoPanoramas


360° Video Rigs: Wild and Unique

In my research I’ve stumbled across many unique camera systems. Many of which are fascinating but are either not being used anymore, defy categorization, currently a prototype, or perhaps was a singular creation.

Immersive Media: Mapping Presentation 2012
Immersive Media: Dodeca 2360more info
The original cube from Freedom360
Elphel Eyesis4Pi
Canon Vixia / 24 camera rig
Overview One
Panoptic Camera
FullView Camera Rig
The Mill – Custom Red Dragon Camera Rig
FascinatE’s Omnicam ARRI Alexa M Rig
IC720
Social Animal: SA9
Sensocto
IPIX Media360
Occam Omni Stereo
Panasonic Dive
Pentax Prototype
Live Capture Using Panoramic Photography with One Camera
6 GoPro Cameras with six Entaniya fisheye lenses
360 video using five Canon M cameras
Calibration of Omnidirectional Cameras in Practice
TENGO2VR Q-1 Mark II
Pi Of Sauron – 3D Printed, Raspberry Pi 360 Video Rig
Making VR Video with the Kodak PIXPRO SP360
Spherecam
GoPro Session Rig
Aposematic Jacket
Nodal Ninja Multi-Cam Pano bracket system
3D printed Xiaomi Yi Rig
GoPro Session: 3D printed rig
Shooting 360° Video in 48K Using 12 Sony Xperia Z5 Smartphones
Nikon Multi-Ball (prototype)
Custom 3D 360 Rig using 13 Xiaomi Cameras
360 rig using six Flare 4KSDI cameras
Tripletcam
ALLie Go
Genlocked GoPro Rig – tested with fast moving footage
GoPro Omni announcement
Handmade 360 rig using SJ400 cameras (x13)
Brahma 360
Fisheye lens rig
Quantum Leap Pro
Shuoying PDV3600
GO6D: nine new 360 cameras planned
Insta360 Nano – 360 camera attachment
Handmade 360VR 2D/3D Rig
Condition One Reveal ‘Bison’ Cinematic VR Camera
The Open 360 Camera Hardware Repository
Ricoh WG-M1: 360 rig
Prototype Back-Bone GoPro with sensor & fisheye lens attached via ribbon cable extension
Prototype iZugar GoPro rig with sensors & fisheye lens attached via ribbon cable extensions
Using the iPhone front and rear cameras to capture 360 video (with fisheye lenses)example footage
Yezz announces Sfera smartphone with a 360-degree camera
Android phone owners can record 360-degree VR video with NeoEye
— Visual Effects Society: VR Post Production (includes camera discussions) – p1, p2, p3
Open-Source Panoramic Video: Bloggie + OpenFrameworks & Processing
LV2 rocket 360 camera
Bivrost 360 rig
SmartPano 360
Water cooled GoPro blocks for battery compartment
UCVR Eye: 3D 180 video or fold camera to capture 360 video
I-mmersive VEYE
Nico360
Orb VR
TwoEyes VR
Back-Bone Modulus Sensor Housing – enables you to use a sensor extension ribbon and place the image sensor away from the camera body
Canon 360 rig using five ME200S-SH super35mm CMOS cameras
Alcatel 360
Yi Jump rig
— UW Guerrilla: Rigs 1 & Rigs 2
Kodak SP360 4k with Entaniya 280° lens installed
Google Jump rig using Xiaomi cameras
GoPro Omni teardown and used to create a genlocked custom rig
Go!PanoS1
Briskeye
Panasonic Prototype 360 Camera Rig
Aleta S2
Kandao Obsidian
360 light stick concept
DKvision Aura: Cinematic VR Camera
Hacking Samsung Gear 360 for 8K 360 timelapse
Cinegears: Helius 6Intervideo: Helius rigs
Drexel Digital Media Department: 360° Studio Camera Rig
GoXtreme WVR20, VR27, WVR21, VR40 Live
GoPro is developing a consumer spherical camera
VantaVR – Red Epic Dragon 360 rig
XL Catlin Seaview SVII camera
Boxfish 360 rig with clever underwater lighting system
PMast – rig using spherical lens with fiber-optic strands – more info
iZugar Z8XL prototype
Iliad Syncbox Dual GoPro Fisheye Rig
Interesting combinations of 360 video cameras to enable dailies previewing
Polaroid R360
Occly – wearable personal safety device
Ebeeii PE-1 & Ebeeii ME-1
TE720
Custom GoPro with sensor extension, fisheye lens, aluminum cooling faceplate, and genlock box
Custom GoPro rig with sensor extensions and fisheye lens
Kodak SP360 4k with custom 280° fisheye lens
FirstLook360 – rescue operations camera
Leica BLK360 – 360 LiDAR scanner
Lighting ring for ZCAM S-Series
Drivers perspective 360 rig – extremely unwise and dangerous
Digital Domain’s proprietary 360 camera


360° Video Rigs: DIY 3D Printing

So 360° video isn’t hard enough for you? You want to 3D print your own rig too?

YI Build VR Camera
Purple Pill VR – 3D models for 360 mono, 360 stereo, Google Jump
Thingiverse: Cylindrical Stereo Mobius Rigin-depth experimentation
Thingiverse: Collection of 360 video rigs
Thingiverse: search for 360 video rigs
Shapeways: search for 360 video rigs
Sumo360 Rig
SJ4000 360 Rig
IncreDesigns
Cardboard 360 video rig
Mirrored light bulb for super cheap cylindrical video capture

Custom Mounting Base for the Kodak PIXPRO SP360 4k rig
Stereoscopic 360 Mounting Base
Dual mounting base & bracket (includes USB & HDMI access port)
Dual mounting base (includes USB & HDMI access port, tripod mount)
SP360 to GoPro mount converter
3 Camera Mount for Underwater Housings


Unsuccessful Kickstarter Projects

Sadly these Kickstarter projects weren’t funded since they didn’t reach their goal. But they are unique and deserve to be recognized.

Blocks Camera
— modular camera rig with 4 sensors
Blocks-Camera

Centr Cam
— partial coverage: 360×56°, single camera body with 4 sensors
Centr-Cam

Shot
— iPhone attachment with dual 235° fisheye lenses
Shot-iPhone-attachment

Occube
— full coverage: 360×180°, 6 GoPro cameras
Occube

Lensbaby Circular 180+ for GoPro camera
— GoPro housing attachment with 185° fisheye lens
— plug and play (no camera modding required)
Lensbaby-Circular-180-for-GoPro-Camera


History of 360° Film

The concept of capturing a huge panoramic perspective isn’t a new one. There are been some fascinating projects early in film history. And only now is that dream being fully realized.

Early Cylindrical Film History
Cinéorama (1900 Paris Exposition)
Lumière Photorama (1902)
Circarama (Disneyland)

Early 360° Video
Page of Omnidirectional Vision
Dynamic Surround Video
Shooting 360-degree video with four GoPro HD Hero cameras
Canon 5D Mark II fisheye rig

Spherecam
— Dual 35mm film fisheye rig – More info

360Heros-HungryShark
Photo Source

Blueprint to Blastoff: Free Engineering Materials for the Planetarium or Classroom

Talia-Bio-PhotoWe are offering 3 distinct educational modules, focusing on aspects of spacecraft engineering, to anyone with a planetarium or classroom who would like to use them. They supplement, but are independent of our newest show From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA and are being shared free of charge.

This article was written by Talia Sepersky. She currently works as a planetarium educator at the Charles Hayden Planetarium, Museum of Science, Boston.

SECTIONS
Intro: Putting the “E” back in “STEM”
Module 1: Fixing the Hubble Space Telescope
Module 2: Gravity And Space Travel
Module 3: Design a Mission
The Guides
4k Downloads
Teacher Bundles


Intro: Putting the “E” back in “STEM”

When it comes to STEM, planetarium shows tend to be very good at covering the science, technology, and even the math portions, but engineering often gets left out. To help fill this void, in 2013 we, the staff of the Charles Hayden Planetarium at the Museum of Science, Boston, teamed up with NASA to make a planetarium show about spacecraft engineering. The result of this partnership is the show “From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA,” which explores what it takes to design, test, build, and fly a successful space mission.

As much as we would have liked to, we could not talk in detail about every part of spacecraft engineering during the show. However, through the partnership with NASA, we were able to expand on a few engineering topics from the show in three separate, supplementary education modules. We are extremely pleased to be able to offer these modules to anyone who wants to use them completely free of charge.

The modules themselves have three very different lengths, styles, and topics, and are designed to be presented in different ways. They can be used on a planetarium dome, and a flatscreen version permits their use on a conventional screen as well. Although each goes into depth on topics that are raised in “From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA,” they all stand on their own and require no knowledge of the show itself. The three modules are: “Fixing the Hubble Space Telescope”, “Gravity and Space Travel”, and “Design a Mission”.


Module 1: Fixing the Hubble Space Telescope

We’ve found that many people in our audiences know that there was something wrong with Hubble when it launched, and that it was eventually fixed. However, few people tend to be aware of the details. The first of our modules, “Fixing the Hubble Space Telescope,” goes into some of those details. It’s the most straightforward of the three modules, consisting of a single video approximately eight minutes long. Large portions of the narration are undertaken by Dr. Jeffrey Hoffman, a former astronaut who flew on the first Hubble servicing mission.

With this module we wanted to focus on a specific case of spacecraft engineering, and Hubble Servicing Mission 1 provides a fantastic real life example. We also wanted to bring in the idea that failures can be instructive.

This module starts by introducing Hubble in space, and then describing how astronomers realized the telescope had a flaw, using some of Hubble’s earliest observations to make the point. It then takes Hubble apart to show the primary mirror and allow Dr. Hoffman to describe exactly what went wrong with making it.

While still looking at a cutaway view of Hubble, Dr. Hoffman goes on to explain the “fix” designed by engineers to repair Hubble, describing the arrangement of mirrors that allowed light entering Hubble’s tube to be refocused before landing on the detection instruments. While he is providing the narration, the visuals show this in action, following a light path all the way through Hubble to the instruments.

The module then moves on to the installation of the new optics on Hubble, with Dr. Hoffman talking about the work on the shuttle mission. This is accompanied by visuals of Hubble and the space shuttle in space, as well as actual video clips from the mission. In one of our favorite parts of this module, Dr. Hoffman shares his story of receiving the phone call that let him know the fix had worked, as well as some thoughts on what it felt like to actually touch Hubble. Some of the visuals for this portion include Hubble images, comparing pictures of the same objects before and after the repair.

The module concludes with the idea that we can learn from failures like Hubble’s. To quote Dr. Hoffman at the module’s end, “The important thing, though, is if you do have a failure, you really need to be able to learn from it. To have a failure that you don’t learn anything from, that’s tragic.”


Module 2: Gravity And Space Travel

It turns out that describing what goes on during a gravity assist can be tricky business. This module introduces some of the mechanics of the momentum transfer that happens during a gravity assist maneuver through Earth-based and space-based examples, as well as describing some of the various ways gravity assists can be used in a space mission.

Since gravity assists can be a tough subject to teach and the depth a presenter goes into will vary widely with different audiences, we designed this module to be as flexible as possible. It is broken up into five segments, each about 1-2 minutes in length (for a total of about 7 minutes of video). Each segment can be presented independently of the others if the presenter only wants to use some but not all. They can also follow after each other, with each segment building on the one before.

We created this format with the idea of using live interpretations in between each of the segments, to reiterate or emphasize the content covered in the previous segment and set up for the next one. However—maximum flexibility!—they can also be strung together to create one unbroken video, depending on the presenter’s preferred style. The core ideas behind momentum transfer and gravity assists are presented in segments 2 and 3, so our recommendation is that at least these two be used.

Segment 1 is relatively straightforward. It starts with the idea that spacecraft travel is often not as easy as pointing the spacecraft at its destination and giving it a push. It introduces the terms “gravity assist” and “momentum transfer” and also defines the word “momentum.”

Segment 2’s purpose is to help the audience gain a better understand of the transfer of momentum using an Earth-based example. To this end, we enlisted the help of a local roller derby team. We wanted to emphasize the idea that gravity assists work not just because the planets are large (i.e. have a lot of gravity) but because they are also moving (i.e. have a lot of momentum).

For this, we had one skater (designated Skater One) hold still and whip her teammates around her as they approach. While her teammates’ paths change, their speed remains more or less the same. We then recreated the same scenario with Skater One also in motion. This time, when she whips her teammates around, their speed increases noticeably even as Skater One’s decreases, due to the momentum transfer between them.

Segment 3 builds on the Earth-based example with a space-based one, specifically the New Horizons gravity assist flyby of Jupiter in February 2007. It starts by looking at what would have happened if New Horizons had gone directly from Earth to Pluto, then looks at the Jupiter flyby. The visuals show an overhead view of New Horizons approaching Jupiter and then visibly increasing its speed as it flies past. This segment uses some actual numbers to get across how much momentum Jupiter has to spare and to emphasize the fact that the planet is, for all practical purposes, not actually affected by losing some. It ends by describing the changes in New Horizons’ speed and flight time as a result of the flyby.

Since Segment 3 presents how a gravity assist can be used to speed a spacecraft up, Segment 4 explores how one can be used to slow a spacecraft down. It shows how the angle at which a spacecraft approaches a planet determines whether the planet transfers momentum to the spacecraft (to speed the spacecraft up) or the spacecraft transfers momentum to the planet (to slow the spacecraft down). It also re-emphasizes the idea that, no matter what the spacecraft does, it will have no practical effect on the planet.

The final segment, Segment 5, brings up the use of multiple gravity assists in a single mission, requiring careful planning many years in advance. To conclude, it loops back to the idea raised in Segment 1 that many space missions are only possible with the use of gravity assists (showing some of the rather convoluted paths these missions took), and that by making clever use of them we have vastly expanded our knowledge of the Solar System.


Module 3: Design a Mission

The “Design a Mission” module is the most interactive of the three and requires a live presentation. In this activity the audience, using information provided to them by the presenter, designs a spacecraft to search for signs of water in the Solar System. They have to choose a destination and then, based on that destination, a power source and whether their spacecraft will be a lander or orbiter. If they design their spacecraft well to suit their destination, the mission will succeed. If they do not, the mission will fail (and how it fails depends on the spacecraft design).

The module itself is made up of thirteen video clips to incorporate all the possible outcomes of the audience’s decisions. In total, the video clips make up about 35 minutes of footage, but a presenter should only need a fraction of that during any given presentation.

The first clip represents the audience’s first decision: will their spacecraft travel to Mars or Saturn in search of evidence of water? The visual for this clip is fairly basic, with images of both of those planets on the screen.

Once they’ve chosen the destination, the second clip represents the audience’s next decision: will the spacecraft be an orbiter or a lander? The presenter may want to provide the audience with some of the benefits and disadvantages of each, or ask the audience to come up with some on their own. The visual is of the two different styles of spacecraft. The “lander” option is based roughly on Cassini with a Huygens-style lander attached to its side.

The third decision is whether to make the spacecraft solar or nuclear-powered, and there are two clips that can potentially be used depending on whether the audience chose an orbiter or a lander. If they chose “lander,” the corresponding clip shows two versions of the lander-style spacecraft, one with solar panels and one without (the nuclear reactor is visible on the bottom edge of the nuclear-powered spacecraft, but is small and not immediately obvious like the solar panels). If they chose “orbiter” the visual is the same, with the orbiter-style spacecraft instead. Again, the presenter may want to make sure the audience knows the benefits and drawbacks of each choice.


Now that they have designed their spacecraft, it’s time to send it to the chosen planet and see if it succeeds. There are eight different clips to represent the eight possible outcomes of the audience’s choices. All start with a liftoff from Earth and a view of the spacecraft moving towards its destination. What happens once it starts moving depends on how well the spacecraft was designed.

The four Mars scenarios (nuclear orbiter, nuclear lander, solar orbiter, and solar lander) all succeed. The two lander scenarios make use of the landing sequence of the Curiosity rover for visuals. The landers will find evidence for water in the form of “blueberries,” frost, and silica deposits. The orbiters will find evidence of water from seeing river channels, hydrogen deposits, and rampart craters.




It’s much harder to succeed at Saturn, and only one scenario, the nuclear-powered orbiter, will lead to success. If the audience chose a solar-powered spacecraft, then as it moves through space towards Saturn the picture will turn to static to represent the spacecraft losing power and shutting down. If they chose a nuclear-powered lander, they will see a rather stunning sequence of their lander entering the atmosphere, heating up, and exploding. If they chose a nuclear-powered orbiter, they will find evidence of water in the geysers on Enceladus and in Saturn’s E Ring.




Since not all of the mission designs succeed, the presenter may wish to talk about failure in spacecraft engineering. To this end, we wanted to show audiences that the professionals also sometimes don’t get it right. The final clip shows images from four real life failed missions from different countries, specifically the Vanguard rocket, the Mars Climate Orbiter, the Phobos-Grunt mission, and the Akatsuki mission. As with the end of the “Fixing Hubble” module, the idea is to emphasize that failures happen, and that the important thing is to learn from them when they do.


The Guides

Between them, these three modules present a lot of information, some of it very specific. To make them as easy as possible for a large variety of institutions to use, we’ve also created planetarian guides to go with each. Our hope is that a presenter with no background in any of these three topics can make an effective presentation on any or all of them using just the material found in the corresponding planetarian guide. In addition to the script for the module, a set of FAQs, and a glossary, each guide contains copious background information as well as some suggestions for presentation.

The “Fixing Hubble” guide includes a layout of Hubble’s optics, even more detail about the flaw and how it was fixed, a brief breakdown of each of NASA’s Hubble servicing missions, and a list of Hubble specifications.

The “Gravity and Space Travel” guide goes into greater detail about the mechanics of gravity assists, how momentum is transferred, and why the spacecraft’s trajectory changes. It also looks at the usefulness of gravity assists on specific missions and provides a list of missions that have made notable uses of gravity assists. In the script section, it provides some guidelines for live interpretation in between the video segments as well instructions on how to recreate the roller skater demo from Segment 2 in house, using either staff or audience members.

The “Design a Mission” guide includes specific descriptions of each of the visuals in the clips and what they are designed to represent. There is an outline for the progression of the module, with some guidelines for discussion, background information on the pros and cons of landers, orbiters, solar power, and nuclear power, and a description of why each mission succeeds or fails. There is also a list of all of the video clips included with this module.

Separate from the planetarian guides, there is a set of educator guides for teachers using the modules in a standard classroom setting. The educator guides are geared more towards using the modules as part of a lesson in a school environment rather than a presentation in a planetarium show, and the information they include is not as detailed as that in the planetarian guides. There are also educator guides for topics not included in the modules, including “Waves and Information Transfer” and “Infrared Astronomy,” which also expand a bit on topics raised in the show “From Dream to Discovery.”


4k Downloads

To ensure that many different institutions, classrooms, and other settings can make use of our modules, we are offering them in a variety of formats. The modules are all available in 1K, 2K, and 4K fulldome versions for planetarium domes. There are also flat versions available for use in standard classrooms or for anyone using a flatscreen projector (complete with captions).

4k domemaster downloads are available on the ESO Fulldome Archive.


Teacher Bundles

The Teacher Bundles for “Fixing Hubble” and “Gravity Assist” include the flatscreen captioned versions of the modules as well as the educator guides. The classroom version of “Design a Mission” is web-based, so the Teacher Bundle for that module includes the educator guide and link to the web-based activity. The modules page also includes a Teacher Bundle with the “Waves and Information Transfer” and “Infrared Astronomy” educator guides.


Copyright 2015 International Planetarium Society; article used with permission.

This material is based upon work supported by NASA under grant number NNX12AL19G. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed are those of the Museum of Science, Boston and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

DJ Spooky: The Hidden Code – Performing in the Dome

My love for live music in the dome is undeniable. The idea is simple but powerful: Allow the synthesis of live performance and astronomy visuals to create a uniquely awe-inspiring experience.

Having thrown a series of live music events, each with its own custom dome visuals, we now have a collection of 4k dome material. So when DJ Spooky approached us with the idea of partnering to create a live fulldome show, it felt like a natural match. And the premiere of the show is just a few weeks away.

DJ Spooky: The Hidden Code — tickets
Performing at the Charles Hayden Planetarium, Museum of Science
Thursday, September 24, 2015 — 7:00–9:00 pm

DJSpookyLive_TheHiddenCode


Now Booking Dome Performances

After the premiere of the album and fulldome show is when things get interesting for you. DJ Spooky is looking for domes to perform in! For live bookings please contact Sozo.

We have also created a canned version of the show which is meant to compete with evening laser shows. If you’re interested in licensing the show, then please contact me.

4k Fulldome Show Optionsfulldome trailer
— Live performance (visuals split by song)
— Canned show (45 minute show)

Flat Theater Options [16:9 ratio]flat trailer
— Live performance (visuals split by song)
— Canned show (45 minute show)


More Info About The Hidden Code Album

Imagine a visual odyssey through the cosmos, driven by lush musical compositions and inspired by complex themes of astronomy, engineering, biology, and psychology. The Hidden Code is the newest work by Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky. Commissioned by Dartmouth College’s Neukom Institute for Computational Science, Miller composed the album based on conversations with several of Dartmouth’s leading researchers.

The album features Dartmouth theoretical physicist and saxophonist Stephon Alexander; and Dartmouth physicist and author Marcelo Gleiser who reads his original poetry.

Check out the free online streaming of The Hidden Code album.

Savor this synthesis of emerging science, poetry, and melody with immersive visions overhead as The Hidden Code pushes art into science. Science into music. Music into art.

Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky, is a composer, music producer, performer, multimedia artist and National Geographic Emerging Explorer. He has collaborated with an array of recording artists, from Metallica and Chuck D to Steve Reich and Yoko Ono. He is the author of Imaginary App, Rhythm Science, Sound Unbound and Book of Ice.

Stephon Alexander is a theoretical physicist, tenor saxophonist and recording artist. He specializes in cosmology, particle physics and quantum gravity. He is the Ernest Everett Just 1907 Professor of Natural Sciences at Dartmouth and a National Geographic Emerging Explorer.

Marcelo Gleiser is a theoretical physicist specializing in particle cosmology. He is the author of The Island of Knowledge, A Tear at the Edge of Creation, The Prophet and the Astronomer, and The Dancing Universe. He is the founder of NPR’s blog 13.7 on science and culture. He is the Appleton Professor of Natural Philosophy and Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Dartmouth.

TheHiddenCode_ShowPoster


Press

NPR – The Hidden Code: An Embrace Of Art And Science
Sound of Boston – Interview
Dartmouth – DJ Spooky Album Explores Universe With Dartmouth Scientists

Dome Screening at SIGGRAPH 2015

Our short fulldome film Waiting Far Away has been selected to be screened during SIGGRAPH 2015! So if you will be attending then please check it out.

Scheduled within the Art Reel: Part 1 sessions:
— Monday, Aug 10 /// 10:45am-11:00am
— Tuesday, Aug 11 /// 12:45pm-1:00pm
— Tuesday, Aug 11 /// 3:45pm-4:00pm
— Wednesday, Aug 12 /// 12:45pm-1:00pm
— Wednesday, Aug 12 /// 4:45pm-5:00pm
— Thursday, Aug 13 /// 12:45pm-1:00pm

The VR Village Dome will be in Exhibit Hall G in the South Building of the Los Angeles Convention Center.

Cycle – Fulldome Short

Cycle is a short fulldome piece which uses timelapse photography to reveal the majesty of Earth’s natural environments. It’s a subtle meditation on how a small shift in our perception of time can heighten our awareness of the intricate ecosystem surrounding us. The cycle emerges.

Prior to teaching the MassArt 2015 course, Eric wanted to get more in-depth experience with fulldome production. So he spent the summer camping and shot a bunch of beautiful timelapse photography with a fisheye lens. Then he selected the best timelapse shots, did some tests in the dome, composed the music in 5.1 surround, and edited together this stunning piece for the dome.

Eric Freeman is an electronic music producer, multi-instrumentalist, photographer and video artist. In his music production, Eric weaves together elements of world, electronic, and experimental sounds to create a sonic landscape accompanied by visuals. His recent video work is a combination of light painting photography and time lapse.

Shot with a Canon 6D, Canon 8-15mm lens, and a Kessler parallax motorized rail system.


Domemasters Freely Available

  • Available for planetarium use. Please contact me to obtain a download link.
  • 4k domemaster frames, 30fps, 5.1 surround & stereo audio
  • 2k MOV or MP4
  • 1k MOV or MP4

Terms: permission to freely screen to the public in planetariums as you see fit. You must screen the short in full and unedited. Not to be used in other shows without permission.


Screenings

Conferences & Festivals
— Melbourne International Film Festival 2016 (Melbourne, Australia)
— Currents New Media Festival 2015, IAIA Dome (Santa Fe, NM)
— Further Fest 2017 (Nashville, TN)
— Bauhaus Exhibition 2017, Bauhaus University Weimar (Weimar, Germany)
— HUBweek 2017, Swissnex Dome (Boston, MA)

International Planetariums
— ESO Supernova planetarium (Garching, Germany)
— GEMS American Academy, Planetarium (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates)
— Hvězdárna a Planetárium Brno (Brno, Czech Republic)
— Stuttgart Planetarium (Stuttgart, Germany)
— Digital Mobile Planetarium Wenu Mapu (Rio Negro, Argentina)
— Anápolis Planetarium (Anápolis, Brazil)
— ARK Dome (Geneva, Switzerland)
— Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Planetarium (Mashhad, Iran)
— Baikonur Planetarium (Poland)
— StratoSphere Domes (Eastbourne, England)
— Roi-Et Planetarium, Science and Cultural Center for Education (Phitsanulok, Thailand)
— Portable Planetarium (Novosibirsk, Russia)
— Portable Planetarium (Zhoushan, China)
— Metaspace Planetarium (Seoul, Korea)
— Scitech Planetarium, Scitech Discovery Centre (West Perth, Australia)
— Planetarium and Observatory of Cà del Monte (Cecima, Italy)
— Herne Observatory (Herne, Germany)
— Esfera Espacial Planetarium (Chiapas, Mexico)
— NEST Dome (Québec, Canada)
— Yeongyang Firefly Astronomical Observatory (Yeongyang, South Korea)
— Agora Science Center (Debrecen, Hungary)
— Gyeongsangnamdo Institute of Science Education (Gyeongnam, South Korea)
— Adelaide Planetarium (Adelaide, Australia)
— Adventure Domes (Saint Petersburg, Russia)
— Interactive Science Museum, Newton Park (Krasnoyarsk, Russia)
— Portable Planetarium (Czech Republic)
— Gwacheon National Science Museum (Gwacheon, South Korea)
— Kiev Planetarium (Kiev, Ukraine)
— Ulsan Science Museum (Ulsan, South Korea)
— Zhejiang Science and Technology Museum, Planetarium (Hangzhou, China)
— National Youth Science Center (Dongil-myeon, South Korea)
— Association Andromede, Observatoire de Marseille (Marseille)
— Fundación ProyectaRSE, portable Dome (Bogotá, Colombia)
— Skyward Planetarium (Tamil Nadu, India)
— Çağ University, Space Observation & Research Center (Mersin, Turkey)
— Planet Crete (Crete, Greece)
— Novosibirsk Planetarium (Novosibirsk, Russia)
— Portable Planetarium (Athens, Greece)
— Planetario Malargüe (Mendoza, Argentina)
— JC Cinesferic (Madrid, Spain)
— Portable Planetarium (Huelva, Spain)
— Pro Planetario Movel (Curitiba, Brazil)
— Csillagszekér Planetarium (Hungary)
— Community Dome (North East England, UK)
— University of the Free State – Naval Hill Planetarium at the Centre for Earth & Space (Bloemfontein, South Africa)
— Portable Planetarium (Madrid, Spain)
— AL-Ma’arifa Foundation For Culture (Baghdad, Iraq)
— Astronomisches Rechen-Institut Planetarium (Heidelberg, Germany)
— imseCAVE, University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
— Eugenides Planetarium (Athens, Greece)

USA Planetariums
— Museum of Science, Charles Hayden Planetarium (Boston, MA)
— Adler Planetarium (Chicago, IL)
— IAIA: Institute of American Indian Arts, Digital Dome (Santa Fe, NM)
— Science Museum of Virginia, Planetarium (Richmond, VA)
— Glastonbury Planetarium (Glastonbury, CT)
— West Virginia University Planetarium (Morgantown, WV)
— Northside ISD Planetarium (San Antonio, TX)
— Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, Planetarium (Fort Collins, CO)
— Sudekum Planetarium, Adventure Science Center (Nashville, TN)
— SMSU Planetarium (Marshall, MN)
— Neag Planetarium, Reading Public Museum (Reading, PA)
— East Village Planetarium, The Girls Club (New York, NY)
— University of Texas at Arlington Planetarium (Arlington, TX)
— Chapel of Sacred Mirrors [CoSM], Dome (Wappingers Falls, New York)
— Anchorage Museum Planetarium (Anchorage, AK)
— Gary E. Sampson Planetarium (Wauwatosa, WI)
— COSI Planetarium (Columbus, OH)
— Tombaugh Planetarium, New Mexico Museum of Space History (Alamogordo, NM)
— Acheson Planetarium, Cranbrook Institute of Science (Bloomfield Hills, MI)
— Illinois State University Planetarium (Normal, IL)
— SciTech Museum, Planetarium (Aurora, IL)
— Hatter Planetarium, Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA)
— Framingham State University Planetarium (Framingham, MA)
— Portable Planetarium (Centennial, CO)
— Collier County Public Schools, Portable Planetarium (Naples, FL)
— Dreyfuss Planetarium, Newark Museum (Newark, NJ)
— Show Me Miami (North Miami Beach, FL)
— Sam Houston State University Planetarium (Huntsville, TX)
— Wynwood Dome (Miami, FL)
— Manheim Township Planetarium (Lancaster, PA)
— Peterson Planetarium, Emporia State University (Emporia, KS)
— Southern Utah University, Portable Planetarium (Cedar City, UT)

Distributors
— ESO Fulldome Archive
— E&S Digistar Cloud Library
— Spitz: Scidome Network
— Dome Club (UK)
— British Fulldome Institute
— Metaspace
— Adventure Domes
— Kosmos Scientific de México

Cycle_EricFreeman_Poster

The Unknown Between – MassArt 2015: Fulldome Show

During the 2015 Spring semester at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, students explored the topic of hypnagogia. In less than 5 months these students collaborated on all aspects of storytelling, concept development, surround sound design, and 4k fulldome production to create an immersive experience which explores the moment between wakefulness and sleep.

It’s amazing that the students were able to complete a 4k show with 5.1 surround sound… within one semester!
MassArt_SIM
Due to the success of the previous MassArt 2013 show, we decided to work again with MassArt to bring art students into the planetarium. This semester the course was taught by Eric Freeman with Nita Sturiale in an advisory role. Special thanks to Cole Wuilleumier as the TA. Together they did an incredible job of enabling the students to feel creative and comfortable within the often confusing fulldome technical requirements.

Students: Corinne Perreault, Katherine McGrath, Caleb Chase, Michael Degregorio, Michael Dunne, Emily Shapiro, John Steiner, Shannon Whalen, Molly Rennie, Sara Neary, Dan Callahan, Gabriel Golbfarb
Instructor: Eric Freeman
Teaching Assistant: Cole Wuilleumier
Advisor: Nita Sturiale
Special Thanks: Jason Fletcher, Toshi Hoo


Domemasters Freely Available

  • Available for planetarium use. Please contact me to obtain a download link.
  • 4k domemaster frames, 30fps, 5.1 surround & stereo audio
  • 2k MOV or MP4
  • 1k MOV or MP4

Terms: permission to freely screen to the public in planetariums as you see fit. You must screen the short in full and unedited. Not to be used in other shows without permission.


Screenings

Conferences & Festivals
— Melbourne International Film Festival 2016 (Melbourne, Australia)
— Further Fest 2017 (Nashville, TN)

International Planetariums
— ESO Supernova planetarium (Garching, Germany)
— GEMS American Academy, Planetarium (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates)
— Stuttgart Planetarium (Stuttgart, Germany)
— Digital Mobile Planetarium Wenu Mapu (Rio Negro, Argentina)
— ARK Dome (Geneva, Switzerland)
— Baikonur Planetarium (Poland)
— StratoSphere Domes (Eastbourne, England)
— Portable Planetarium (Novosibirsk, Russia)
— Scitech Planetarium, Scitech Discovery Centre (West Perth, Australia)
— Herne Observatory (Herne, Germany)
— Nemesis Planetarium (Civitanova Marche, Italy)
— Zhejiang Science and Technology Museum, Planetarium (Hangzhou, China)
— Çağ University, Space Observation & Research Center (Mersin, Turkey)
— Planet Crete (Crete, Greece)
— Portable Planetarium (Athens, Greece)
— JC Cinesferic (Madrid, Spain)
— Portable Planetarium (Huelva, Spain)
— University of the Free State – Naval Hill Planetarium at the Centre for Earth & Space (Bloemfontein, South Africa)
— AL-Ma’arifa Foundation For Culture (Baghdad, Iraq)
— Spacedome (Uithoorn, Netherlands)
— imseCAVE, University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
— Eugenides Planetarium (Athens, Greece)

USA Planetariums
— Museum of Science, Charles Hayden Planetarium (Boston, MA)
— IAIA: Institute of American Indian Arts, Digital Dome (Santa Fe, NM)
— Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, Planetarium (Fort Collins, CO)
— Northside ISD Planetarium (San Antonio, TX)
— Science Museum of Virginia, Planetarium (Richmond, VA)
— John Carl Pogue Planetarium, Grand Prairie ISD (Grand Prairie, TX)
— SMSU Planetarium (Marshall, MN)
— Neag Planetarium, Reading Public Museum (Reading, PA)
— University of Texas at Arlington Planetarium (Arlington, TX)
— Chapel of Sacred Mirrors [CoSM], Dome (Wappingers Falls, New York)
— COSI Planetarium (Columbus, OH)
— Acheson Planetarium, Cranbrook Institute of Science (Bloomfield Hills, MI)
— Moorhead Planetarium, Minnesota State University (Mankato, MN)
— SciTech Museum, Planetarium (Aurora, IL)
— Framingham State University Planetarium (Framingham, MA)
— Collier County Public Schools, Portable Planetarium (Naples, FL)
— Manheim Township Planetarium (Lancaster, PA)

Distributors
— ESO Fulldome Archive
— Spitz: Scidome Network
— Dome Club (UK)
— British Fulldome Institute
— Kosmos Scientific de México

MassArt_UnknownBetween_Poster

Sentient – MassArt 2013: Fulldome Show

During the 2013 Spring semester at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, students explored the topic of consciousness. In less than 5 months these students collaborated on all aspects of storytelling, concept development, sound design, and fulldome production to create an immersive experience which explores the creative, perceptive, and unexplored mind.

What they were able to accomplish in such a short time is pretty astonishing and I’m excited to share their work with you.
MassArt_SIM
This project happened because MassArt Studio for Interrelated Media Professor Nita Sturiale approached us with the idea of having her students create work in the Planetarium. Special thanks also goes out to Lina Maria Giraldo, Karina Tovar, and Eric Freeman. Check out their behind the scenes blog to learn more.

Students: Nicole Barron, Jesslyn Boisclair, Jenna Calderara, Kerri Coburn, Megan Dauphinais, Lila Debas, Nicole Dube, Chip Dunn, Stephen Kelly, Esther Moon, Sam Okerstrom-Lang, Danielle Thibeault, Kelsey Trottier, Cole Wuilleumier, Alexandra Zanca
Instructor: Nita Sturiale
Project Manager: Lina Maria Giraldo
Teaching Assistant: Karina Tovar
Special Thanks: Jason Fletcher, Eric Freeman, Max Azanow, R. Berred Ouellette
Sound Source Material: Adam Blake, Jacob Bohlan, Tom Fahey, Brendan Smith


1k Quicktime Freely Available

  • Available for planetarium use. Please contact me to obtain a download link.
  • 1k MOV or MP4

Terms: permission to freely screen to the public in planetariums as you see fit. You must screen the short in full and unedited. Not to be used in other shows without permission.


Screenings

Conferences & Festivals
— Melbourne International Film Festival 2014, Melbourne Planetarium (Melbourne, Australia)
— Further Fest 2017 (Nashville, TN)

International Planetariums
— ESO Supernova planetarium (Garching, Germany)
— GEMS American Academy, Planetarium (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates)
— Hvězdárna a Planetárium Brno (Brno, Czech Republic)
— Stuttgart Planetarium (Stuttgart, Germany)
— Digital Mobile Planetarium Wenu Mapu (Rio Negro, Argentina)
— ARK Dome (Geneva, Switzerland)
— Baikonur Planetarium (Poland)
— Gotoinc Planetarium (Calcutta, India)
— StratoSphere Domes (Eastbourne, England)
— Portable Planetarium (Novosibirsk, Russia)
— Portable Planetarium (Zhoushan, China)
— Scitech Planetarium, Scitech Discovery Centre (West Perth, Australia)
— Herne Observatory (Herne, Germany)
— Zhejiang Science and Technology Museum, Planetarium (Hangzhou, China)
— Çağ University, Space Observation & Research Center (Mersin, Turkey)
— Planet Crete (Crete, Greece)
— Portable Planetarium (Athens, Greece)
— JC Cinesferic (Madrid, Spain)
— Portable Planetarium (Huelva, Spain)
— University of the Free State – Naval Hill Planetarium at the Centre for Earth & Space (Bloemfontein, South Africa)
— AL-Ma’arifa Foundation For Culture (Baghdad, Iraq)
— Spacedome (Uithoorn, Netherlands)
— SARL Unevisiteduciel (Mérignac, France)
— Eugenides Planetarium (Athens, Greece)

USA Planetariums
— Museum of Science, Charles Hayden Planetarium (Boston, MA)
— IAIA: Institute of American Indian Arts, Digital Dome (Santa Fe, NM)
— Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, Planetarium (Fort Collins, CO)
— Sudekum Planetarium, Adventure Science Center (Nashville, TN)
— Taylor Planetarium, Museum of the Rockies (Bozeman, MT)
— Arvin Gottlieb Planetarium, Science City (Kansas City, MO)
— Northside ISD Planetarium (San Antonio, TX)
— Science Museum of Virginia, Planetarium (Richmond, VA)
— SMSU Planetarium (Marshall, MN)
— Neag Planetarium, Reading Public Museum (Reading, PA)
— University of Texas at Arlington Planetarium (Arlington, TX)
— Chapel of Sacred Mirrors [CoSM], Dome (Wappingers Falls, New York)
— COSI Planetarium (Columbus, OH)
— Acheson Planetarium, Cranbrook Institute of Science (Bloomfield Hills, MI)
— Tarleton State University, Planetarium (Stephenville, TX)
— SciTech Museum, Planetarium (Aurora, IL)
— Hatter Planetarium, Gettysburg College (Gettysburg, PA)
— Framingham State University Planetarium (Framingham, MA)
— Collier County Public Schools, Portable Planetarium (Naples, FL)
— Manheim Township Planetarium (Lancaster, PA)

Distributors
— ESO Fulldome Archive
— Dome Club (UK)
— British Fulldome Institute
— Kosmos Scientific de México

MassArt_Sentient_Poster

IX Symposium 2015 – Highlights

I recently attended the IX Symposium 2015 in Montreal, Canada. The Société des Arts Technologiques (SAT) is the perfect venue for such a completely unique event dedicated to immersion. And I am left with so much inspiration to act on! Each day had its own helpful theme to organize the screenings and presentations =
Day 1: Opening /// Day 2: Expansion – Shifting Horizons /// Day 3: Hybridization – Integration Techniques /// Day 4: Emergence – Re-cognizing Complexity /// Day 5: Transcaling – Beyond Boundaries.

The IX Symposium welcomes artists, researchers, educators, producers and distributors to share knowledge and experience about immersive and interactive technologies. It also welcomes broader audiences to world premieres of cutting edge digital works in Society for Arts and Technology’s dome, the Satosphere.

It is truly an open exchange platform through a series of keynotes, panels, demonstrations, performances and immersive productions. It also helps to democratize access to immersive spaces and to the tools and processes used for the creation of original contents. It’s important to foster a network facilitating the creation of a community and the circulation of people, ideas, and works. This will help rethink the models of production, the formats, the delivery systems, and the creative processes needed to maintain and nurture an international platform for strong artistic expressions and open innovation.

The Goals for IX 2015

  • Present state of the art practices and technologies in digital art, science, design and engineering.
  • Foster a critical discourse on immersion and experience.
  • Contribute to the creation of standards that ease the creation and distribution of groundbreaking works.
  • Set common goals to accelerate the expansion of this strongly experience-driven medium.
  • Gather an inspired and vibrant community.

The photographer of the symposium was Sebastien Roy
The photos below are ©SebastienRoy.ca – (source of photos)


Opening Ceremony at the Biosphere

Cocktails while listening to Allegra Fuller Snyder give the opening speech to commemorate the architect of the geodesic dome, Buckminster Fuller.


In the Dome

Various fulldome screenings, VJ’s, and performances.


Entropia Performance

A special performance of live immersive music, dome visuals, and a custom LED geodesic dome; which the musician performed from within. Every element was reactive to the music and was entrancing. Here is a video recording of the live performance. Also check out the french video interview or translated text interview.


Presentations & Talks

Various presentations, workshops, and interactives.

The Dome Dialogues – Ethan Bach

An interview with Ethan Bach discussing some of his recent work on Morphos (Fulldome Artist in Residence), IFAA (International Fulldome Arts Alliance), and BETA – Emerging Technology Arts.

Chapters
0m 5s – Intro
0m 22s – What have you been working on recently?
1m 51s – What is Morphos: Artists in Residence?
2m 22s – What inspired you to start the program?
4m 3s – What medium do the artists typically work in?
6m 12s – How did you come to work in fulldome?
9m 56s – What is vDome?
12m 27s – What is IFAA: International Fulldome Arts Alliance?
15m 50s – What is your big dream for IFAA?
20m 25s – What do you wish was possible?
25m 58s – Have you experimented with dome interactivity?
30m 16s – Fulldome business competition

Quotes from the Interview
“I’m currently working on IFAA: the International Fulldome Arts Alliance. Last year at the IX Symposium 2014 in Montreal, a bunch of us got together since we had been thinking about this for a long time. The whole idea of expanding the arts in fulldome and how do we do that. How do we get existing venues and people who have portable domes to get on board with this idea that there needs to be alternative content. So we decided that we would start the IFAA and our mission is to create an open alliance where fulldome venues and artists can come together and start interacting and planning.”

“As a video artist, I’ve always been interested in getting to the emotional experience of the viewer. Trying to help the viewer grasp something that maybe they don’t understand or challenging their views on something. I find that hitting the emotional part of the viewer is the easiest way to do that. And once you add immersive and interactive, it just takes it so much further than you could ever hope for. I’m always trying to express it in a feeling, idea, or concept.”

“The challenge that comes in for me is that we had five artists during the Morphos fulldome artist in residence program and they all have different mediums that they each focus on. And thats what I love; the need to focus on the artist staying within their own skill set. So some of them were doing live action shots or computer renders. One artist had shot fisheye photography of dolphins prior to the residency. So there was a lot of different content that we were working with. We did a weeks worth of workshops and then the artists just have to pound out the work and we provide them with support. And for this upcoming program we are adding a production assistant, so they have help in getting their work ready for a dome preview.”

Bio
Ethan Bach is the CEO of BETA – Emerging Technology Arts, which specializes in immersive and interactive digital environments, especially fulldome. He received an MFA in Electronic Arts from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2008 and BA in Media Production from The Evergreen State College in 1996. His expertise in immersive video art and project management builds from almost 20 years of experience.

Bach served as Principal Investigator for a Department of Defense (DOD) grant developing interactivity for fulldome and a research associate for a National Science Foundation grant developing tools and content for fulldome environments in his former position as the Digital Dome Manager at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). In just two and a half years he developed five dome courses, an artist in residence program, curated several art shows and created vDome with Charles Veasey. vDome is the world’s first software for the digital dome that runs off a single computer and allows for easy plug and play, VJing, interactive art, and gaming. vDome is currently in open source release. (Source for the bio text)